wood and wire succulent hanger – diy

IMG_1.jpgHappy Wednesday, friends! Have you been experiencing a crazy wet Spring like we have in most of Canada? For the past few days I’ve woken up to several inches of snow, only to have it all melt by the end of the day. I’m sort of getting used to wearing my winter coat and boots in the morning and then rain boots and no jacket in the late afternoon. I thought that I would share a Springy DIY with you, in parts to encourage the nice weather to stick around, and in parts to keep my sanity.

IMG_2.jpgI came across this Wood and Wire Succulent Hanger in a greenhouse. I didn’t actually see the name of what it was really called. What I did see was the ridiculous price tag of this beautiful but $50.00 item, put it down, turn to my husband and say, “I can make this.” So I did.

IMG_3.jpgThis is what you will need:

Moss

Wire (I used chicken wire)

Wood (I reclaimed and old game board)

Plant

Soil

Screws

Drill

IMG_4.jpgStep One. Cut a piece of chicken wire. Make sure that it will be able long enough to wrap around your wood board. Cut extra so that it can also fold under to trap the plant, soil, and moss.

IMG_5.jpgStep Two. Wrap the wire around the wood. Let the two end pieces meet in the back. Fold the bottom up the back as well.

IMG_6.jpgStep Three. Cut some long wire pieces and fasten the ends and bottom together.

IMG_7.jpgStep Four. Add the moss. Place the plant and soil gently within the moss and between the board and the wire. Play around with it until you are satisfied with the way it looks.

IMG_8.jpgStep Five. Hang your lovely project with screws and a drill. Wrap the wire around the screws for added support.

IMG_9.jpgStep Six. Now, water and enjoy!

IMG_10.jpgThe total cost of my project was $9.00 without tax. That’s a heck of a lot better than what it would have been to buy it. Plus, I now have the added bonus of making it a DIY for Hello, Scarlett. Sometimes, life just works out to be in your favour. Hear that, Spring?

See you all in May!

Emory

meet you in meacham

IMG_1.jpg IMG_2.jpgIMG_3.jpg IMG_4.jpgIMG_5.jpg IMG_6.jpgIMG_7.jpg IMG_8.jpgIMG_9.jpg IMG_10.jpgThe spring edition of Kinfolk was dedicated wholly to the idea of home. Volume Eleven explored everything from living as one, to living in a full house, to being homeless, to being a wanderer, to furniture design, to home tours. One small section of the magazine explored four children’s ideas of their dream home. Each child described what their house would look like in one paragraph, which it was then built for them out of cardboard. I thought that this was such a beautiful and simple idea, yet one that was deep rooted with my own search for a new home. I was somewhat envious of the naivety of the children, yet found their imaginations to be extremely beautiful. I think the whole appeal of the article was geared towards the little kid in all of us.

The photo below is what my twelve-year-old self painted in my very first oil painting class. I stumbled across it very recently and very much by accident. Only after reading Kinfolk did I put two and two together and realize that I was doing exactly what the article was also exploring. I find it amazing that I had some sort of idea of my dream home before I was even old enough to consider owning any property.

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Having already seen countless acreages, Geoffrey and I have turned our search to include homes on large lots situated in small towns outside of our current city. One particular home was located in the village of Meacham, Saskatchewan. With less than 100 people inhabiting the small town, to say that it looked and felt different from our current city of over 300,000 would be an understatement. However, that is what I find so tempting. As I grow older and am becoming more self aware, I notice that I seem to feel more at home in smaller towns that offer next to no amenities. I love the idea of living in a Tiny House, off the grid, in the middle of the prairies, and with a few acres for our animals. I would like to be young and mortgage-free, and to grow our own food and raise chickens, of all things. I want to live quietly with my small family amongst nature. I want to accomplish these dreams sooner rather than later.

Emory

The Flower Cottage
“I’d like to live in a normal little cottage with flowers on the roof. I’d invite my friends over all the time to make daisy chains and play I Spy. It would also have a nice kitchen. My favourite thing to bake is cookies and my oven would so big that I could make hundreds and share them all.”
– Willow, Age 6, Kinfolk

good vs bad antique shopping

IMG_1.jpg IMG_2.jpgIMG_3.jpg IMG_4.jpgIMG_5.jpgIMG_8.jpg IMG_9.jpgIMG_10.jpg IMG_11.jpgIMG_12.jpgIMG_6.jpg IMG_7.jpgIMG_13.jpg IMG_14.jpgA few weeks ago, my husband and I dedicated an entire day to antiquing. We have some really great shops on one street in particular in our city. We parked our vehicle at one end of the block and decided to walk to each antique store lugging our purchases behind us. I think that it was only -15°C that day, so why not? We had better make hay while the sun shines!

The first store was called Back to Coffee Beans. It’s our favourite vintage store in Saskatoon. I like it because it has two levels of “stuff”. It’s mostly filled with oversized furniture, but has really great smaller items like bowls, jewellery, skulls, and pictures. There are always great deals happening, and the guy who works there is also incredibly friendly as well. Geoffrey likes it because the store also doubles as a coffee shop. While I’m looking around and staying focused, he’s usually playing with something and sipping a hot drink.

The second store was called Owl & Crate. They have more expensive but still really unique items in their shop. You can tell that it’s a very organized and well-run business. However, because they have several new items mixed in with the vintage pieces, and a few side businesses going on in one little store, it feels like a mall inside of a strip mall. I much prefer to go antique shopping in divey-er locations. To me, it feels more authentic.

All in all, it was a very good day.

Emory

girl in a yellow dress

IMG_1.jpgIMG_2.jpgIMG_3-1.jpg copyOne of my more recent purchases from eBay was a 1970s yellow dress that I purchased from the Unbelievably Vintage Store. I then had a photo shoot done where I wore this dress, a floral crown, my Lotta from Stockholm clogs, and a terrarium necklace (courtesy of the Hello, Scarlett Store). The snow had melted, and while it wasn’t warm by any normal standards, it was a heat wave for March in Saskatchewan. I could sense summer being just around the corner, and I felt like a little flower child celebrating fashion and Mother Nature. In a way, it was like my mini Coachella, only much further north and without the great music.

Hey, I’ll take whatever I can get.

Emory

an auctioning we will go

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0015_11A0016_10ALast weekend we attended our first auction as a married couple. Can I just freely admit that I am now addicted? The day started off at 7 am. We got up, Geoffrey took Truman Capote for a walk, I got ready, fed the animals, and then we left by 8 am. Our first stop was to buy a disposable camera. The last time that I had used one was ten years ago at my brother’s wedding. It felt so small and precious, and I was worried that my aim would be off or there would never be enough lighting. Next we picked up breakfast at Tim Horton’s and headed south of the city to a town called Delisle. We made it there at 9 am, just as the auction was starting. The sun was shining, and it was looking like a wonderful day.

For the first three hours of the auction, Geoffrey and I wandered around and bid on many things. I snapped a few pictures, we made a few friends and foes (the latter of which we nicknamed ‘Orange’), and ate a few hot dogs. We got in a bidding war with Orange over some crates and two separate buffalo skulls. She ended up paying $500 for the two skulls, thanks to us. Afterwards, she said that she needed a cigarette, stood up, got her arm stuck in her coat sleeve, and smashed one of the skulls on the floor. We tried so hard not to laugh, but it was just too funny. At the end of the day we ended up bidding on another skull and won it for only $20. We were very lucky.

Around 1 pm Geoffrey drove back to the city to let our dogs out for a bathroom break and to feed them a snack. As luck would have it, a blizzard came down and he was caught in a whiteout on the highway. What should’ve taken under an hour for a round trip took nearly two hours in total. In the meantime, I had bought a green elevator chair for $95. Bobby, one of the workers at the auction, was egging me on with winks and hand gestures to keep going higher and higher. Everyone seemed to be enjoying it so I kept going up in price until the other guy eventually stopped bidding. I don’t know if it was worth the price that I ended up paying, but the fact that it matches the outside of our home, along with the memories that I have purchasing it make it priceless to me. Anyway, our cat Boo Radley seems to thoroughly enjoy sleeping on it ever since I covered it with a wool blanket and placed it under a sunny window.

Things we bought that day:

– Buffalo skull: $20

– Elevator chair: $95

– Two wooden crates: $30

– Vintage leather bells: $20

– 1917 clothes hanger: $7

– Outdoor hanging cowbell: free (from the nice ladies at the auction)

After we got home I told Geoffrey that it was one of the best days that I had ever spent with him. He agreed.

Have a beautiful Easter, everyone!

Emory

  • Welcome, friends! My name is Emory. I am a wife and mother to three (one on earth, one in heaven, and growing another). This is our life on the Canadian prairies.
    email: helloscarlettblog@outlook.com

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