little stone schoolhouse

PHOTO_1.jpg PHOTO_2.jpgPHOTO_3.jpg PHOTO_4.jpgPHOTO_5.jpg PHOTO_6.jpgPHOTO_7.jpg PHOTO_8.jpgPHOTO_9.jpg PHOTO_10.jpgPHOTO_11.jpgPHOTO_12.jpg PHOTO_13.jpgStone buildings can be found all across Saskatchewan. The majority of them, however, reside in the lower half of the province. Stone was more commonly found than trees, and the early settlers who chose to reside in southern Saskatchewan had come from parts of the world where building with stone was customary. However, cheaper materials eventually replaced the use of stone almost altogether.

The Original Victoria School in Saskatoon is now located on the grounds of the University of Saskatchewan. Flanked by much more impressive grey-stone buildings, this little stone structure is all but a forgotten figure on the campus. Many of Saskatchewan’s original stone schools from the early 21st century have been demolished. However, the fact that Victoria School is still standing and has been relocated to a site of great importance is a testament to the continuity of education and history within this province of ours. Although the school may be tiny in size, what it represents, especially on the grounds of the campus, is absolutely immense. 

Emory

The little stone schoolhouse was built in 1887. It was the focus of social and educational activity during the early years of settlement and remained in use until replaced by a new two-room school in 1902. A few years later the stone school was dismantled and reconstructed on the grounds of the new University of Saskatchewan to make room for a larger school on the original site. The stone schoolhouse, which has been restored as a school museum, is considered the oldest public building in Saskatoon.

– Menno Fieguth and Deanna Christensen, “Historic Saskatchewan”

The first permanent school building in Saskatoon was erected in 1887, a one-room facility constructed of local fieldstone. The first function held there, on its completion in late December, was a grand opening ball.

– Gail A. McConnell, “Saskatoon: Hub City of the West”

People chose stone not only for its resistance to fire, however, but also because it represented durability and prosperity. For major public institutions, such as schools and churches, the use of stone reflected the community’s pride in its ability to build well, and indicated a sense of permanence. For the new frontier, masonry construction, whether of brick or stone, visibly displayed the success of the pioneers and their faith in the future growth of their communities.

– Margaret Hryniuk and Frank Korvemaker, “Legacy of Stone: Saskatchewan’s Stone Buildings”

4 Comments

  1. sf

     /  04/19/2014

    Great pics! Had to stop by when I saw your new cute gravatar profile pic. Love your new header pic too – simple, yet unique and sweet!

    Like

  2. I remember visiting for a field trip in elementary school and getting to role play as students!

    Like

  3. I really like your pictures Emory.

    Like

  4. Joanne S

     /  04/13/2014

    For such a “little schoolhouse” it is rather impressive. Enjoyed.

    Like

  • Hello, friends. My name is Emory. I live on the Canadian prairies with my husband, daughter, and animals. Welcome!
    helloscarlettblog@outlook.com

  • Thank you to all those who liked, commented, and sent me messages yesterday. I am overwhelmed by your love. I would like to share one more thing. Since 2013, I have used my blog as a creative outlet and my Instagram account as my diary. I feel it’s a much better platform to reach out to others, and to be more truthful (if we dare). I try to only follow those who don’t always show the ups and highs of their “perfect” lives. While I think that the more popular, beige square, ad-infused, California chic, glam mother accounts are beautiful, I also find them to be depressing and unoriginal. A miscarriage is real. It is nothing to be ashamed of. If you don’t choose to discuss yours, that’s totally fine! I needed to share mine in order to begin my grieving and healing process. I am now a mother to two children. This is something that I did not want to, nor will I ever hide. Yes, our second child came much too early and did not survive, but that does not make his/her life any less worthy. Our baby was alive at one time. Our baby has a soul. Now, our baby has a name and will forever be part of our family. We are a family of four- three on earth and one angel in heaven. So, thanks again all. Sadness. What a difference a year can make. Last holiday season, Remy turned 10 months old. She had just gotten her first two teeth, and on Christmas morning, had learned to crawl. This year, we are mourning the loss of our second child. I suffered a miscarriage this week, and it has left a deep void in our family. This was going to be our Christmas card where we revealed to friends and family our joyous secret. Now, it remains one of our only photos as a family of four. Because of this, I want to share it with the world. Give your children an extra hug and kiss for me tonight. You are so blessed to have them. All my love, Emory.
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