every mornin’ i see him waiting at the home depot

PHOTO_2.jpgPHOTO_1.jpgPHOTO_3.jpg PHOTO_4.jpgPHOTO_5.jpg PHOT0_6.jpgPHOTO_7.jpg PHOTO_8.jpgPHOTO_9.jpgIf ever you have done a home renovation, chances are you have gone, more than once, to a local hardware store. Actually, no renovation needs to be involved. As long as you have ventured out from living under your parent’s roof and you either rent an apartment or own a house, you have most likely frequented one of these stores. I know that we often do.

Home Depot is a favourite of mine. I prefer its size and overall layout compared to other stores. I love that it has aisles upon aisles of lumber, paint, lights, flooring, and more. I like to go there and dream about all the possibilities that we can do to Little Green. It is our go-to store for appliances. Its plant section is also where I end up buying most of my succulents. This is not because they have the best options, though it is not horrible by any means. It is because most of their plants are $5 and under, a price that is unheard of at our local greenhouses. Yes, Home Depot, I will always treat entering your structure like an exciting date with my husband. Merely because you always seem to have what we want, and we never leave disappointed.

Emory

a blogger’s dozen: susan’s gingerbread bunnies (y.i.a.h.)

1.0I am so honoured to have Susan Parry sharing her gingerbread cookie recipe on A Blogger’s Dozen. Susan joins us all the way from Australia. She is a wife, mother, baker, cook, blogger, and the heart, body, and soul of ‘Your Inspiration At Home’. This beautiful and delicious recipe today is not only tried and tested out to be scrumptious, but is also just in time to serve as an additional Easter treat. So whether you are reading this post on your android, computer, iPhone, tablet, or by any other electronic means, keep in mind that it is roughly a sixteen hour plane ride from Canada to Australia. Suffice it to say that this post has traveled half way across the world to come to you today, so it’s guaranteed to be a great one.

Emory

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Gingerbread Bunnies:

125 grams of butter

½ cup of sugar

1 large egg yolk

2 cups of plain flour

3 teaspoons of Gingerbread Spice

2 ½ tablespoons of golden syrup or honey

assorted decorations

Preheat oven to a 150°C or moderate oven. Cream butter and sugar until creamy. Add egg yolk and beat well. Gradually add dry ingredients and mix well. Warm golden syrup in microwave on low and add to the mixture and mix well. Knead mixture and roll out to about 3mm in thickness onto a floured table. You can cut shapes from cookie cutters or make your own shapes as we did. Place onto trays lined with greaseproof paper. Bake for 10 – 15 mins approximately until golden brown. Decorate with buttons before they have cooled or use icing after they have cooled. Let cool before serving. Makes about 12 – 20 depending on the size of your cutters or shapes.

Have fun with this and I am sure it would be a winner. Please head on over to my blog if you would like to follow me and if you would like to check out my products head to my website which sends to the USA and Australia. Happy baking!

Susan – Your Inspiration at Home Consultant

A Blogger’s Dozen is a series that was launched in 2014. If you would like to be featured in a post, as well as have free advertisement for that month, please contact Emory at helloscarlettblog@outlook.com. Be sure to send any food-related ideas that you may have. Hello, awesomeness!

little stone schoolhouse

PHOTO_1.jpg PHOTO_2.jpgPHOTO_3.jpg PHOTO_4.jpgPHOTO_5.jpg PHOTO_6.jpgPHOTO_7.jpg PHOTO_8.jpgPHOTO_9.jpg PHOTO_10.jpgPHOTO_11.jpgPHOTO_12.jpg PHOTO_13.jpgStone buildings can be found all across Saskatchewan. The majority of them, however, reside in the lower half of the province. Stone was more commonly found than trees, and the early settlers who chose to reside in southern Saskatchewan had come from parts of the world where building with stone was customary. However, cheaper materials eventually replaced the use of stone almost altogether.

The Original Victoria School in Saskatoon is now located on the grounds of the University of Saskatchewan. Flanked by much more impressive grey-stone buildings, this little stone structure is all but a forgotten figure on the campus. Many of Saskatchewan’s original stone schools from the early 21st century have been demolished. However, the fact that Victoria School is still standing and has been relocated to a site of great importance is a testament to the continuity of education and history within this province of ours. Although the school may be tiny in size, what it represents, especially on the grounds of the campus, is absolutely immense. 

Emory

The little stone schoolhouse was built in 1887. It was the focus of social and educational activity during the early years of settlement and remained in use until replaced by a new two-room school in 1902. A few years later the stone school was dismantled and reconstructed on the grounds of the new University of Saskatchewan to make room for a larger school on the original site. The stone schoolhouse, which has been restored as a school museum, is considered the oldest public building in Saskatoon.

– Menno Fieguth and Deanna Christensen, “Historic Saskatchewan”

The first permanent school building in Saskatoon was erected in 1887, a one-room facility constructed of local fieldstone. The first function held there, on its completion in late December, was a grand opening ball.

– Gail A. McConnell, “Saskatoon: Hub City of the West”

People chose stone not only for its resistance to fire, however, but also because it represented durability and prosperity. For major public institutions, such as schools and churches, the use of stone reflected the community’s pride in its ability to build well, and indicated a sense of permanence. For the new frontier, masonry construction, whether of brick or stone, visibly displayed the success of the pioneers and their faith in the future growth of their communities.

– Margaret Hryniuk and Frank Korvemaker, “Legacy of Stone: Saskatchewan’s Stone Buildings”

in search of our dream home

IMG_1.jpg IMG_2.jpgIMG_3.jpg IMG_4.jpgIMG_5.jpg IMG_6.jpgIMG_7.jpg IMG_8.jpgIMG_9.jpg IMG_10.jpgIMG_11.jpg IMG_12.jpgIMG_13.jpg IMG_14.jpgIMG_15.jpg IMG_16.jpgIMG_17.jpgOur search for an acreage is now in it’s third month. I gave first mention of our house hunting plans in this post here. What I have learned so far is that acreages are tricky. One may have a beautiful surrounding but a house that you could never dream of inhabiting, while the other may have the most gorgeous house sitting on a piece of land that you wouldn’t wish upon your worst enemy. Price is another issue in upon itself. The more space an acreage has, and the closer it is to a major city, the more expensive that property will be. Given the fact that my husband and I are trying to live mortgage-free either with this purchase of an acreage or sometime in the near future, our selection of properties has taken us to more than 30 minutes away from the edge of the city. In a province where half of the year the highways are covered in blowing snow and ice, this is not an ideal situation. 

The little grey acreage that I first showed had a recently redone home. It was stunning. However, it sat on 4 acres of bare land. There were no trees, grass, or a any fence in site. What was in site were your neighbours on either side of you. These photographs today are of another listing that we looked at. As soon as I saw it I immediately fell in love with the land. The house sat on top of a hill, which is rare for our flat, prairie province. Within the 10 acres were a handful of sheds and shops, a 800 square foot barn, fenced land, and a huge pond at the bottom of the hill. It looked like a scene from a Norman Rockwell painting. The inside of the house, however, looked like a Norman Bates setting. The house would inevitably have to be torn down and a new one built in its place. Yet, with its well water, oil heating, and being situated 35 minutes from the city, it would never become our dream property.

In the end, we will not be deterred. We will just have to keep on looking.

Emory

tambukiki

Screen Shot 2014-04-08 at 10.22.13 PMIMG_02.jpgIMG_03.jpgScreen Shot 2014-04-08 at 10.21.23 PMI bought this stained glass sweater towards the end of last year, but had yet to photograph it. I wear it nearly once a week to work, as the pattern clashes and matches just the right amount with almost all of my dresses. Given that it is a crop top, it’s also really trendy right now. 

You’d be crazy not to visit Tambukiki’s eBay store >>>here<<<.

Emory

  • Welcome, friends! My name is Emory. I am a wife and mother to three (two on earth and one in heaven). This is our life on the Canadian prairies.
    email: helloscarlettblog@outlook.com

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