pork and beans revisited

Pork and Beans - 2Nearly two years ago, I had blogged about my newest and fastest growing succulent, Pork and Beans. These plants are known as Sedum or stonecrop plants. To date, this specific type of succulent remains my favourite of over the thirty types that I am currently growing. Its delicate leaves have fallen off over the years and have turned into several separate and flourishing plants of their own. I thought that I would share some additional information and care tips about the Pork and Beans succulent. Additional facts can be gained from the Balcony Container Gardening website.

Screen Shot 2016-02-15 at 11.35.39 AMIntro: The jelly bean plant, also called pork and beans, is an interesting succulent plant that displays jelly beanlike leaves. In the summertime its leaves change from green to bright red, and it bears yellow flowers in the springtime. This colorful succulent does best in hot, sunny apartment balcony gardens and will look best as a “ground cover” in plant containers underneath tall plants with a small footprint, such as a jade plant pruned to look like a tree. The jelly bean plant will also look stunning in a short, squat container set on a table or in a hanging window frame-like plant container.

Scientific Name: Sedum rubrotinctum

Plant Type: Succulent cactus

Light: Full sun

Water: Water the jelly bean plant more in the spring and summer, but still let it dry out in between waterings. Plant Sedum rubrotinctum in well-draining potting soil and never let it sit in water.

Zone: Zones 9 to 10

Temperature: This succulent plant does best in hotter conditions. Do not keep Sedum rubrotinctum outside in freezing temperatures. Take the jelly bean plant inside and display it in an indoor garden for the winter. Keep it by a western- or southern-facing window.

Fertilizer: Fertilize in the spring and summer once a month with a cactus and succulent fertilizer.

Pests and Diseases: No insect pests or diseases are known to severely attack this plant.

Propagation: Propagate the jelly bean plant by taking cuttings. Cut off leaves from the stem, let them dry, and then place the cutting into the soil. Keep the potting soil moist until the cutting begins to grow.

Misc. Info: Be careful when touching this succulent plant, as it can irritate some people’s skin. Also make sure that no pets or children eat this plant. Jelly bean plant leaves are delicate and can fall off easily.



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  1. That is certainly one quirky-looking plant. I just wish they were real jelly beans. I’d also like an ice cream tree and a doughnut bush.

    • Hahaha! That’s quite the imagination.

      Hmm, in that case, my vote is for a pizza tree. I would grow and propagate the hell out of that!


      • A pizza tree sounds great, apart from dropping all those anchovies in the fall, of course.

  • Welcome, friends! My name is Emory. I am a wife, mother of two (one earthside and one with the angels), and an animal rescuer. This is our life on the Canadian prairies.
    email: helloscarlettblog@outlook.com

  • Man, did Remy and I have a standoff this morning. All because she didn’t want to wear socks with her boots. She threw a massive tantrum, and I yelled at her. Afterwards, we went for our walk and everything was back to normal. That is, aside from her puffy eyes and tear-stained face. My poor girl. Parenting can be so hard sometimes. Thank goodness for children being so resilient. 
That disaster behind me is nearly gone. We’re currently installing the last of our kitchen shelves, and our new sink arrived this morning. I’m excited to have a less cluttered spare room!
Have a wonderful week, everyone. This room has not yet been touched by us. It is our master bedroom. Everything about it (aside from our furniture) is exactly the same as when we purchased our home. I think that if we do list in the near future, it will be the only room in our house that we did not renovate. Part of me wants to stay just to finish it. A small part.
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