helter skelter – one year later

fa76934ff5a447027c17a251b14e231c(Image of the Manson Family)

Ever since I first read this article yesterday morning, I have been back and forth as to whether or not I should publish this post. One reason that I am so hesitant is because it follows topics that I normally don’t try to associate with my blog. Another is because I am not supposed to be blogging for a few days! But, just because I want to get away doesn’t mean that the world also stops around me. So here I am.

About a year ago, I posted my review of Helter Skelter after having read the book for the first time. Now I was nowhere near being able to witness the Manson murders unfolding in the news, nor the immediate aftermath. In fact, the book itself was published 11 years before I was born. However, it is one that my mum told me time and time again to read, and so last year, I finally did.

Two nights ago, my mum had made a completely unrelated comment to me regarding Charles Manson. Then yesterday morning, when I logged onto the Us Magazine website of all places, the first article that came up was entitled, “Charles Manson, Mass Murderer, to Marry 26-Year-Old Prison Visitor.” Eerie, I thought, given that we were just talking about him. However, my mum and I are strange that way. We often think about people immediately before something significant happens to them. Inevitably, while I found it eerie, I wasn’t at all surprised that Manson was there in the news. I could not help but click on the article.

The article from the celebrity magazine was without a doubt a very short and biased piece. Mockingly referring to Manson’s fiancé as “the lucky lady,” and to Manson himself as her “sweetheart” and “the happy couple,” the writer was obviously against their decision to wed. Whatever happened to journalism being objective? I get that this it Us Magazine, and that there are much more informative pieces out there, but come on.

That is not to say that I am in favour of Manson and Burton getting married. In all honesty, I felt nothing after reading the article except perhaps a little bit of curiosity. The comments were as suspected. Readers were outraged towards this impending union, other readers attacked those readers for their so-called hatred or stupidity, still others who questioned the law, brought up the gay rights movement, Hitler, Polanski and child molestation, you name it. No controversial stone was left unturned.

What did I do after that? Clicked on Burton’s website and began to read her “truths” about the man she loved. If nothing else, she is a fellow blogger, and I wanted to read what she had to say.

best-luck-explain-thanksgiving-charles-manson-funny-ecard-IuA(Image via ecard)

While this post obviously deals with heavier issues than I am used to discussing, I am curious to hear your opinions on this matter, if you have any. If not, have a fantastic Wednesday!

<3

Emory

the drop review

BeFunky_5.jpgI have a thing where I’ll only watch the first 30 seconds or so of a movie trailer. I figure that if I’m won over in that time span, chances are that I will end up liking the film. I remember seeing my older brother doing that very same thing a few years ago, and thinking that it was an odd thing to do. In the meantime, I began to regard most trailers better than the movies themselves. I eventually came to understand why he did that. In my opinion, the worse or less you see of the trailer, the lower your expectations, and the better the film is. I think that in the end, I’ve developed trailer-phobia.

1.jpgWhile I did only watch the first little bit of the trailer for The Drop, I could have forgone seeing that. Merely knowing that Tom Hardy was starring in it was enough for me to pay for a ticket to the theatre. I know that we shouldn’t judge actors based on their looks alone, but I think that I missed half of the film because I was staring at his beautiful face. Sorry Geoff. This has to be said. Tom Hardy, you are God’s gift to married, single, dating, and widowed men and women everywhere. Amen. :-)

6.jpgI suppose I should say something about the movie itself. Based on the short story, Animal Rescue, The Drop is about a bartender named Bob (Hardy) who is employed by his cousin Marv (James Gandolfini), and the pair become involved in a robbery gone wrong. Bob goes on to meet a waitress named Nadia (Noomi Rapace) who ultimately has a key role in his life, and who also has dangerous connections of her own. In my humble opinion, Rapace hasn’t really shone since starring in The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo trilogy, but she does do a convincing job playing a tortured soul. Maybe that’s her niche. There’s nothing that I can say about Gandolfini that you aren’t already aware of. He plays a broken man in this role, and you witness him transforming his lines into heartbreaking situations. Given that it was the last movie that he ever made, I would say that it was a very fitting sendoff. Ann Dowd, who played Marv’s sister Dottie, also did an outstanding job with her small but vital role. I wish that she would have had a bigger part in the film.

BeFunky_drop-2.jpgThe real star, aside from Hardy, was his puppy Rocco. After being found beaten in a trash can, he is taken in by Bob and Nadia. He gets named after St. Rocco, the patron saint of dogs, the sick, and falsely accused people. St. Rocco’s patronage inevitably correlates greatly with Bob’s own story, and for the better part of the film, the story revolves around the love and devotion between Bob and Rocco.

tom-hardy-with-pup-on-new-film-animal-rescue-1Whether you like intelligently adapted stories, outstanding acting, crime films, adorable pit bull puppies, or scrumptious lips to stare at, you should be going to the theatre to see this movie. It is finally an action flick for both genders. If you don’t believe me, then believe Rotten Tomatoes. They rated The Drop at 88%. Probably because of Rocco’s cuteness. And Tom Hardy’s.

<3

Emory

spring succulents

IMG_1.jpg IMG_2.jpgIMG_3.jpg IMG_4.jpgIMG_5.jpg IMG_7.jpgIMG_8.jpgIMG_6.jpg IMG_9.jpgEarlier last month I went on a succulent shopping spree. Having killed the majority of my plants over the past year, I feel as if I now have a firm grasp on what not to do when trying to grow succulents. With some extra help from a few friendly workers at Home Depot, and this wonderful article from Kinfolk Magazine, I am feeling effervescent (my word of the day). Lookout, Spring, here I come.

“Often by April the snow has melted, to return to the prairie, one hopes, only for brief periods. It is a season of muted colour that holds a special beauty.”

Emory

The above quote comes from Courtney Milne, Prairie Light

prairie light (part 2)

IMG_1.jpg IMG_2.jpg IMG_4.jpgIMG_5.jpg IMG_6.jpgIMG_7.jpg IMG_8.jpgIMG_9.jpg IMG_10.jpgIMG_11.jpg IMG_12.jpgIMG_13.jpg IMG_14.jpg“The prairie is not the kind of place that reaches out and plucks at your romantic heart strings, as do the Rocky Mountains or the sea. The prairie is quiet, gentle, and unassuming, with only fleeting moments of passion and drama. But its dominant moodiness makes the times of vibrant colour all the more exquisite! Now I am amused by people who tell me they find the prairie drab and colourless. Granted the prairie can look monotonous if all you do is drive through it at a hundred kilometres an hour. You need to spend time on the prairie to appreciate the many facets of its personality. Even then, you must take time to look and experience its subtle shifts in temperament. Dull, overcast days offer the best conditions to observe the landscape close-up, yet these are the very occasions when we are least likely to give this land its due. When the tones are even, devoid of bright highlights, or distracting shadows, we can better appreciate the subtle nuances of colour. 

“The prairie is a land of extremes, an immense land that touches all who inhabit it. Neither city nor town offers sanctuary from nature’s dominion. Prairie skies put human architecture in its place; prairie storms recognize no boundaries …

“The immensity of the prairie can overwhelm with a sense of man’s insignificance or offer a profound sense of contentment and peace or exhilarate with a vision of nature’s potency and a grander scheme of things. Whatever the response the prairie will not be ignored … “

– Courtney Milne, Prairie Light

prairie light (part 1)

PHOTO_1.jpg PHOTO_2.jpg PHOTO_4.jpgI recently came across Prairie Light while I was at work. To my good fortune, the branch that I was at was withdrawing this book from their collection. One of the perks of working within a library is that you get first dibs on every item that is chosen to become a donation to the Friends of the Library Shop. As soon as I held Prairie Light in my arms, I knew that I was about to become inspired by many blog posts to come. I only had to read the introduction to the book to discover that all of my own feelings that I have ever possessed towards the prairies were laid out on the pages with such eloquence and grace. I felt as if this book described prairie life in a way that I never could, and yet, had given me clues as to how I will feel towards it in the not so distant future. For those of you who were ever curious about the Canadian prairies, here is the first of a two part photography adventure, with excerpts from Courtney Milne, the talent behind my latest and motivating find. 

PHOTO_7.jpgPHOTO_6.jpgPHOTO_8.jpg PHOTO_11.jpgPHOTO_10.jpg PHOTO_12.jpgPHOTO_13.jpg PHOTO_14.jpgPHOTO_15.jpg“The prairie landscape is, for me, a visual feast that continues to bring joy as well as scope for expression. But it was not always that way. As a child I loathed the harsh winters, but gained healthy respect for the elements. It was on my daily treks to school that I learned to judge how far I could go without freezing my flesh.

“My only childhood memory of vivid prairie colour is watching sunsets. I remember the deep crimson that would linger long after sundown. Yet even the sunset was tainted with the unhappy acknowledgement that I had to go in and get my homework finished.

“I remained on the prairie until I finished university. My first move thereafter was to the land of my childhood dreams, California. It was only then that I realized just how special were the prairie sunsets. My evenings felt lonely and incomplete when the sun dropped out of sight and the sky turned black. The darkness, the continual traffic noise, and the police sirens were poor substitutes for the evening light of home.

“When I returned to the prairie the landscape looked more attractive to me than I remembered. I welcomed the wide open spaces and the sense of freedom endorsed by the infinite prairie skies. I liked the unpredictability and the excitement of the storms. I felt drawn by the vibrancy and sensuality of the prairie colour, and to the distinctiveness of the seasons. No more struggle to remember what month it was; I had only to glance out the window and see the date written on the land or in the trees, or announced by the song of the meadowlark. Prairie light seemed to range across the complete spectrum of human emotion. Identifying with its variety of moods enlarged and enriched my vision.”

– Courtney Milne, Prairie Light

  • Welcome, friends! My name is Emory. I am a wife and mother to three (two on earth and one in heaven). This is our life on the Canadian prairies.
    email: helloscarlettblog@outlook.com

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