a week of christmas: diy your gifts

SucculentHolder8.jpgI am a believer in cheap gifts. Does that sound bad? Not so cheap that your friends and family dread receiving presents from you, and have secretly brandished you as a penny pincher. More like waiting to buy a really nice item once it goes on sale, or making something really beautiful for that special someone that will totally be used on a daily basis. I have also been known to regift. It’s something that I secretly take great pride in performing.

I think that my frugal attitude towards gift-giving stems from the fact that my family is just so damn big. I have immediate family members, step family, in-laws, a nephew and nieces galore, not to mention friends and random workers that I guiltily feel as if I must splurge on. That being said, making presents is something that I whole-heartily believe in.

SucculentHolder11I began this month with this Christmas DIY. Now, I’m here to show you an even simpler, and better yet, free DIY that is perfect for any plant lovers in your circles. I would personally love to receive this gift. So I made it for myself, in anticipation of showing all of you.

Even though I’m Canadian, I’ve had a mild obsession for American Flags lately. I chose to make our bedroom an American-themed room, and made an American-themed Valentine’s Day DIY for HaveHeart Magazine coming in February. Crazy, right? Anyway, I decided to take my obsession to a plant-based level as well. The lines in the can were reminiscent of the stripes in the flags, so really I had no other choice but to turn it into the American flag. However, you can make any motif that you, or your recipient, would like.

SucculentHolder1This is what you’ll need to make a Motif Plant Holder:

Tin Can

Acrylic Paint

SucculentHolder3Paint Brushes

Drill

SucculentHolder2It’s honestly such a straightforward project. To begin, simply drill a hole into the bottom of the tin can for drainage. I kept the lid to use as a plant dish.

SucculentHolder5Next, you’re ready to begin painting. Go wild. Cover half of the can, or the whole can, in whatever designs and colours that you would like.

SucculentHolder6I obviously chose the American Flag.

SucculentHolder9Once you’re done that, fill the can with a plant or succulent. Note, if this is a gift, and you’d like to minimize the chance of the plant dying on them, it’s best to stick to something a little tougher, like from the plant family Cactaceae​. I chose to use this Aloe Vera plant, since it seems to have been planted in magic fairy dust and will not stop growing!

SucculentHolder10SucculentHolder12The last step is to carefully wrap it. Obviously, the longer that you wait to do this, the better. But hey, if you’re the gambling type, then why not wrap it now?

SucculentHolder7See you tomorrow!

<3

Emory

holy sh*t

Processed with VSCOcam with a6 presetHave any of you ever owned an Aloe Vera plant? They are remarkable. Not only can you use the leaves to treat scrapes and burns, but rubbing its juices on your scalp can also reduce dandruff.

I bought my succulent a year and a half ago. It looked like this:

img_84Today, my Aloe Vera plant looks like this:

Processed with VSCOcam with a6 presetThis sucker just won’t stop growing! The day is fast approaching when I’m going to have to repot its leaves. Based on the Farmer’s Almanac website, it looks quite easy. These are the steps:

1. Knock your Aloe out of its pot and find where the offsets are attached.

2. Sever the offsets from the mother plant with a knife.

3. Allow the cuts and the mother plant to callus over for a day or two.

4. Pot them in a standard potting mix, and place in a sunny location.

5. Wait a week to water and keep the soil on the dry side.

Processed with VSCOcam with a6 presetVoila! You can see my previous post on tips for successfully growing succulents here.

Have a fantastic Wednesday!

<3

Emory

have you seen haveheart

IMG_10.jpgHappy Monday, guys! How was your weekend? Did you get up to any 4th of July related activities? Mine was filled with working and taking an impromptu road trip with my husband. For a girl who normally prefers winter over summer months, I am loving how much easier and more fun it is to travel when there is not six feet of snow on the ground! I kind of don’t want the nice weather to go away, ever.

This month HaveHeart Magazine published a DIY of mine that is really great for the summertime. Most of you have seen it already, but here is the link again. Reclaimed wood, plants, dirt, moss, and chicken wire? A plant and sun enthusiast’s haven!

<3

Emory

hello, scarlett giveaway

IMG_9126Hello, friends and happy Friday! I am thrilled to bring to you a giveaway. It’s been a eight months since my last one, so I figured that I am long overdue. The giveaway today is a handmade Travelling Terrarium that comes from the Hello, Scarlett Store. All of the Terrariums in the store come with a unique name that has been based on either its vessel or content. This particular Terrarium is titled, ‘If Nothing Else, At Least I Got A Tin Can.’ Each Terrarium has been carefully filled with rocks, two varying types of moss, one dried flower, and a foreign coin for good luck. These Terrariums are everlasting. They improve the Chi in one’s home. They are the perfect form of greenery for wanderlusts.

IMG_6.jpgHere are the rules:

1. Follow Hello, Scarlett Blog on WordPress (1 entry)

2. Follow Hello, Scarlett Blog on Instagram (1 entry)

3. Follow Hello, Scarlett Blog on Etsy (1 entry)

IMG_5.jpgIMG_4.jpgIMG_9080Be sure to leave comment below to let me know how many entries you’ll receive. I’ll pick a winner on Thursday June 5 and announce it on HSB and on Instagram the morning of Friday June 6. Good luck! 

Emory

pork and beans

1400442467.515521.IMG_3843

I purchased my succulent Pork and Beans on the first of April. I would normally never write a post about only one of my succulents, but I just love this little plant more than anything! When I brought it home, it looked like this:

Screen Shot 2014-05-18 at 9.20.49 PM

In a little over a month and a half, it has tripled in size. (You can see it now sitting in the middle of the planter box in the first photograph, and in the photograph below.) I am able to track its growth on a daily basis. Never have I ever had such success with any of my other succulents. Mine tend to grow slowly but surely, rather than rapidly and heartedly. One of my followers on Instagram recently asked me what my secrets are to growing succulents. While I touched upon it here, I didn’t go into great detail. Now, I want to tell you what I told her. Here are my essential tips for keeping these types of plants.

Processed with VSCOcam with se3 presetA Growing Guide For Successful Succulents

1. Do not bother to invest in pre-packaged, expensive soil. Rather, choose soil from your garden, or preserve the soil that the succulent came with. Top it off with rocks.

2. Always keep your succulents in small clay pots, even if it looks as if they are outgrowing them. Make sure the pot has a drainage hole.

3. Place your succulents in bright, but indirect lighting. Although they may look resilient, they can also burn very easily.

4. Keep your home at a warm temperature. They do not do well in cool temperatures.

5. Do not water them more than twice a week. Keep in mind, though, that each succulent is different. Based on trial and error, I have learned that certain succulents of mine require watering two times a week, while others are on a biweekly schedule. The majority of them, however, I water them once a week.

6. That being said, make sure that your water has either been distilled or is rain water. Water straight from the tap will not help your plants. Store it at room temperature. 

7. I often read that succulents will need to be fertilized once a month. I tried this once with about six of my succulents, all of which ended up dying shortly thereafter. I do not recommend fertilization, but you may have success with it.

8. Try to have fun with them. Experiment in different succulents, and monitor them each day to see how they are doing. Rotate them when you notice them leaning towards the sun. Water them less often if you see that they are turning black, or more often if they appear to be drying up. Remember, while this list may help you grow your succulents more successfully, it does not guarantee their survival. Try not to stress over them too much, because in the end they are only plants. Even my little Pork and Beans!

Emory

  • Welcome, friends! My name is Emory. I am a wife and mother to three (one on earth, one in heaven, and growing another). This is our life on the Canadian prairies.
    email: helloscarlettblog@outlook.com

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