• Hello, friends. My name is Emory. I live on the Canadian prairies with my husband, daughter, and animals. Welcome!
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    This was taken one year ago. It's hard to believe that she was so little. At 2.5 months old, I felt like I had already known her for years. Yet, I still had no idea what I was doing. I was a new mother, and I felt completely on my own. I told myself to take it day by day, and so I did. Somehow, she and I made it through and although she's still so young, our bond today is so unbelievably strong. 
If it's not yet apparent, I'm in an extraordinarily sentimental mood. This morning I found a notebook that I had purchased when @omgkersh and I were seriously considering adoption. I was planning on detailing our journey for our future child. Looking at the date of the receipt, it read 02/25/15. Little did I know that exactly one year later, my daughter would be born on 02/25/16. 
I truly believe that we are constantly being shown signs, we just don't always pay attention. I view what happened today as a reminder to stay strong during times of uncertainty. Things usually work out for the better. I just need to have faith. To say that she has a piece of my heart would be an understatement.
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clay cross planter: diy

I saw a hanging clay planter on Etsy awhile ago, and it’s been on my DIY list ever since. Actually, I’ve always wanted to learn how to throw pots on a wheel. It looks like so much fun! So until I can get my hands on one, here is my rendition of a clay planter. It’s still very fun to create.

Materials

Packaged molding clay
Acrylic paint
Paintbrushes
Toothpicks
Succulent
River rocks
Rope
Rolling pin

Steps

1. Remove the clay from the packaging. Place it on a flat and clean surface. Using a rolling pin, flatten the clay so that it is roughly an inch thick.

2. Now it is time to form a pot. Start with the sides. Determine the height that you would like, then form one cohesive piece of clay that is that exact height. Use the rolling pin to make it smooth. Ensure that the length of this piece will be long enough so that when you bring the ends together, it forms a cylinder large enough to hold your succulent or plant.

3. Take another piece of clay and make it into a circular shape. This will be the base of the pot.

4. Now form a cylinder with the clay in step 3. Gently place it on the base. Attach the cylinder to the base with your fingers. Spend some time blending all of the visible lines on the pot.

5. Using the wooden ends of the paintbrushes, create a drainage hole at the bottom of the pot, as well as two on either side and closer to the top. Make sure that they are wide enough for the rope, and are level with one another.

6. Using the toothpicks, carve crosses into the pot. Once you have completed this, set the pot aside. Let dry overnight.

7. After the clay is completely dry, you may begin to paint it. Start with the base color, covering the exterior and interior of the pot. Once dry, use a different color for the crosses. Let dry once again.

8. Add the succulent and river rocks to the pot. Then take the rope and string it through the two holes on either side of the pot. Knot the ends, and proceed to find a sunny place to hang your new and beautiful creation!

<3

Emory

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cups and succ(ulent)s

IMG_0024The last time I published a post about our kitchen, we had installed new cabinets and had partially rearranged it. After all of that, I still had not yet achieved the light and airy look that I was hoping for. You know the one. I can usually be found in the IKEA catalogue. White walls. Open shelving. Exposed plates. Greenery. Minimalist. So, I rearranged things once again.

IMG_0043I dragged the massive wire storage unit that we purchased from Home Depot into the kitchen, switching out the antique wooden armoire. After I washed the rack down, I set about arranging all of our plates, cups, and succulents on it. 

IMG_0034IMG_0038I couldn’t have asked for a better fit. It blended in so beautifully. I love how it displays our plates and bowls from Crate & Barrel, our glassware from Anthropologie, our organizers from IKEA, and my collection of over thirty succulents that I have been carefully growing over the last few years.

IMG_0039IMG_0023This is now my favourite corner of The Little Barn

IMG_0059Have a great weekend!

<3

Emory

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pork and beans revisited

Pork and Beans - 2Nearly two years ago, I had blogged about my newest and fastest growing succulent, Pork and Beans. These plants are known as Sedum or stonecrop plants. To date, this specific type of succulent remains my favourite of over the thirty types that I am currently growing. Its delicate leaves have fallen off over the years and have turned into several separate and flourishing plants of their own. I thought that I would share some additional information and care tips about the Pork and Beans succulent. Additional facts can be gained from the Balcony Container Gardening website.

Screen Shot 2016-02-15 at 11.35.39 AMIntro: The jelly bean plant, also called pork and beans, is an interesting succulent plant that displays jelly beanlike leaves. In the summertime its leaves change from green to bright red, and it bears yellow flowers in the springtime. This colorful succulent does best in hot, sunny apartment balcony gardens and will look best as a “ground cover” in plant containers underneath tall plants with a small footprint, such as a jade plant pruned to look like a tree. The jelly bean plant will also look stunning in a short, squat container set on a table or in a hanging window frame-like plant container.

Scientific Name: Sedum rubrotinctum

Plant Type: Succulent cactus

Light: Full sun

Water: Water the jelly bean plant more in the spring and summer, but still let it dry out in between waterings. Plant Sedum rubrotinctum in well-draining potting soil and never let it sit in water.

Zone: Zones 9 to 10

Temperature: This succulent plant does best in hotter conditions. Do not keep Sedum rubrotinctum outside in freezing temperatures. Take the jelly bean plant inside and display it in an indoor garden for the winter. Keep it by a western- or southern-facing window.

Fertilizer: Fertilize in the spring and summer once a month with a cactus and succulent fertilizer.

Pests and Diseases: No insect pests or diseases are known to severely attack this plant.

Propagation: Propagate the jelly bean plant by taking cuttings. Cut off leaves from the stem, let them dry, and then place the cutting into the soil. Keep the potting soil moist until the cutting begins to grow.

Misc. Info: Be careful when touching this succulent plant, as it can irritate some people’s skin. Also make sure that no pets or children eat this plant. Jelly bean plant leaves are delicate and can fall off easily.

<3

Emory

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magical cacti

POTD - Cactus 1“The witching hour, somebody had once whispered to her, was a special moment in the middle of the night when every child and every grown-up was in a deep deep sleep, and all the dark things came out from hiding and had the world all to themselves.”

– Roald Dahl, The BFG

When we purchased our land for The Little Barn just over one year ago, I noticed that among the sand, rose bushes, and caragana trees, were naturally growing cacti. Given that we live in the prairies and experience a harsh climate, I was not aware that our environment could even support a cactus plant if it was not indoors. I quickly dug them up, making three pots in total. Then the machinery went to work and levelled our lot.

I placed the cacti in small, sandy containers and in west-facing windows. However, they did not grow. In fact, the more attention that I paid to them, the more they were shrivelling up and appearing unhealthy. Then Geoffrey and I went away on vacation, and I wasn’t able to water my cactus plants for almost two weeks. I thought that they would surely have died. To my surprise, they no longer looked sickly, but had filled out and began to sprout new growth! 

I was elated! I thought, ‘what funny little creatures. Just when I had almost given up hope, they turn around and come back to life in full force’. I think that my succulents teach me more life lessons than almost anything else in my life right now. They have taught me to slow down, be patient, and take a leap of faith when I’m feeling a need to.

POTD - Cactus 3Or, perhaps I am merely becoming a crazy ca(c)t(i) lady. Regardless, I feel as if there is a sprinkle of magic in my little plants. I only hope that they, among other things, come alive at night when everyone is asleep. Isn’t that a nice thought?

<3

Emory

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try this : terrarium kit

Terrarium Kit DIY 5I first gave mention to this beautiful little Sedum + Moss Terrarium kit three months ago when I received it as a gift from my husband. I was so excited to plant it, but I wanted to wait for the perfect container before I did so. It took me awhile to realize that I had it all along. So rather than having to purchase a new glass terrarium, I merely rearranged some succulents, and voila! Sometimes the best surprises are those that are right under our noses.

Terrarium Kit DIY 1This kit came with everything except for the purple succulent and the river rocks. I had removed the former from another one of my plants. The latter I stole from my parent’s acreage. I was originally going to propagate the purple succulent into a new pot when another ingenious idea struck me. I had a feeling that it would look quite beautiful paired alongside this kit. It turns out that wasn’t wrong. I couldn’t imagine this terrarium kit without one!

Terrarium Kit DIY 3Terrarium Kit DIY 4Now all of my plants friends, both new and old (and stolen), can be together. :-)))

Terrarium Kit DIY 6I really love the way that this terrarium kit turned out. If and when I start to see some growth (the packaging indicates two weeks), then I may have to go out and buy another one. Stay tuned!

<3

Emory

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