indoor/outdoor succulent basket – diy

Many weeks ago, I had gone to one of my favourite local greenhouses to buy a hanging succulent basket. I thought that the front of our house desperately needed one, and I had seen these types of hanging planters when I had gone there previously. I had never thought of filling a basket with succulents instead of flowers, and after leaving empty handed that day, I couldn’t get them out of my mind. So after days and days of pining over them, I decided to go back and buy one!

I wasn’t sure how much they cost, but I was hoping that they wouldn’t be more than $50. When I had arrived, I found the first basket and flipped the tag over. It was $75. My heart sank. I did the same for the others and they were all the same price. Darn.

Remy and I walked around the greenhouse for the next 20 minutes hoping to find smaller succulent baskets. There were none. Knowing that all of their plants were reasonably priced, my next thought was to make my own. 

I picked out a beautiful basket and quickly gathered up all of the same type of succulents that were found in it. Then we paid for everything and left. The total was only $23!

Next I asked Geoff to meet me at the dollar store. He was between shifts and so he sat in the vehicle with Remy while I ran inside and grabbed a hanging basket for $2. After that, he drove to his second job and we drove home.

That evening I spray painted the basket and switched out the rope for twine. Then I added the succulents one by one.

After playing around with the arrangement, I grabbed a ladder and drill and went outside. First I hung the iron bracket. Finally, I hung the basket.

Remy helped! Kidding, she kept going in and out of the house and closing the door on me. Brat.

All in all I’m more in love with my version of the succulent basket than what I saw at the greenhouse. It was really fun to make. Additionally, I saved $50! 

This is something that will last the entire year, as you should bring it inside during the colder months. Then, its back outside for the spring and summer. For $25, how can you go wrong?

<3

Emory

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hanging terrarium: diy

To me, there is almost nothing more beautiful than a terrarium. To see a plethora of vibrant colours all contained within glass is like a living oil painting. I also love the challenge of keeping the greenery alive. When it flourishes, it’s a great achievement.

I purchased this hanging terrarium and air plant at the Gardenscape trade show. Remy and I went together and Geoffrey stayed behind in order to work on our house. Maneuvering a stroller through the displays while trying to keep grabby baby hands away from all of the plants proved to be difficult. I actually came home with a pocket full of succulent leaves courtesy of little miss. What I also picked up were a few great items to which I turned into a hanging terrarium.

Afterwards, I hung it up near our front window. It looks so beautiful. Too bad the wall behind it needs much work! Oh well. One project at a time. ;-)

Have a wonderful weekend.

<3

Emory

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dutch growers

I don’t know about you, but I love spending time among plants. I feel like it’s good for my soul.

I recently took Remy to one of my favourite local greenhouses, Dutch Growers. It was a misty spring day and rather than going for our afternoon walk outside in the rain, I decided to instead walk around a greenhouse. That way, we were able to keep warm and take in a bit of nature. It did wonders for us.

Remy adores plants. Every Sunday we water all of the succulents around our home. We also have to water the air plants every second day. She loves watching me do it. I name every plant for her and afterwards she plays with the watering can and plant mister.

It took me years to get acquire a green thumb, so I hope to instill one in Remy at a young age. I’m already very lucky that she has such an interest in greenery!

If anyone ever finds themselves on the Canadian prairies, then please stop by Dutch Growers. You will not be disappointed.

<3

Emory

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cups and succ(ulent)s

IMG_0024The last time I published a post about our kitchen, we had installed new cabinets and had partially rearranged it. After all of that, I still had not yet achieved the light and airy look that I was hoping for. You know the one. I can usually be found in the IKEA catalogue. White walls. Open shelving. Exposed plates. Greenery. Minimalist. So, I rearranged things once again.

IMG_0043I dragged the massive wire storage unit that we purchased from Home Depot into the kitchen, switching out the antique wooden armoire. After I washed the rack down, I set about arranging all of our plates, cups, and succulents on it. 

IMG_0034IMG_0038I couldn’t have asked for a better fit. It blended in so beautifully. I love how it displays our plates and bowls from Crate & Barrel, our glassware from Anthropologie, our organizers from IKEA, and my collection of over thirty succulents that I have been carefully growing over the last few years.

IMG_0039IMG_0023This is now my favourite corner of The Little Barn

IMG_0059Have a great weekend!

<3

Emory

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pork and beans revisited

Pork and Beans - 2Nearly two years ago, I had blogged about my newest and fastest growing succulent, Pork and Beans. These plants are known as Sedum or stonecrop plants. To date, this specific type of succulent remains my favourite of over the thirty types that I am currently growing. Its delicate leaves have fallen off over the years and have turned into several separate and flourishing plants of their own. I thought that I would share some additional information and care tips about the Pork and Beans succulent. Additional facts can be gained from the Balcony Container Gardening website.

Screen Shot 2016-02-15 at 11.35.39 AMIntro: The jelly bean plant, also called pork and beans, is an interesting succulent plant that displays jelly beanlike leaves. In the summertime its leaves change from green to bright red, and it bears yellow flowers in the springtime. This colorful succulent does best in hot, sunny apartment balcony gardens and will look best as a “ground cover” in plant containers underneath tall plants with a small footprint, such as a jade plant pruned to look like a tree. The jelly bean plant will also look stunning in a short, squat container set on a table or in a hanging window frame-like plant container.

Scientific Name: Sedum rubrotinctum

Plant Type: Succulent cactus

Light: Full sun

Water: Water the jelly bean plant more in the spring and summer, but still let it dry out in between waterings. Plant Sedum rubrotinctum in well-draining potting soil and never let it sit in water.

Zone: Zones 9 to 10

Temperature: This succulent plant does best in hotter conditions. Do not keep Sedum rubrotinctum outside in freezing temperatures. Take the jelly bean plant inside and display it in an indoor garden for the winter. Keep it by a western- or southern-facing window.

Fertilizer: Fertilize in the spring and summer once a month with a cactus and succulent fertilizer.

Pests and Diseases: No insect pests or diseases are known to severely attack this plant.

Propagation: Propagate the jelly bean plant by taking cuttings. Cut off leaves from the stem, let them dry, and then place the cutting into the soil. Keep the potting soil moist until the cutting begins to grow.

Misc. Info: Be careful when touching this succulent plant, as it can irritate some people’s skin. Also make sure that no pets or children eat this plant. Jelly bean plant leaves are delicate and can fall off easily.

<3

Emory

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