pork and beans revisited

Pork and Beans - 2Nearly two years ago, I had blogged about my newest and fastest growing succulent, Pork and Beans. These plants are known as Sedum or stonecrop plants. To date, this specific type of succulent remains my favourite of over the thirty types that I am currently growing. Its delicate leaves have fallen off over the years and have turned into several separate and flourishing plants of their own. I thought that I would share some additional information and care tips about the Pork and Beans succulent. Additional facts can be gained from the Balcony Container Gardening website.

Screen Shot 2016-02-15 at 11.35.39 AMIntro: The jelly bean plant, also called pork and beans, is an interesting succulent plant that displays jelly beanlike leaves. In the summertime its leaves change from green to bright red, and it bears yellow flowers in the springtime. This colorful succulent does best in hot, sunny apartment balcony gardens and will look best as a “ground cover” in plant containers underneath tall plants with a small footprint, such as a jade plant pruned to look like a tree. The jelly bean plant will also look stunning in a short, squat container set on a table or in a hanging window frame-like plant container.

Scientific Name: Sedum rubrotinctum

Plant Type: Succulent cactus

Light: Full sun

Water: Water the jelly bean plant more in the spring and summer, but still let it dry out in between waterings. Plant Sedum rubrotinctum in well-draining potting soil and never let it sit in water.

Zone: Zones 9 to 10

Temperature: This succulent plant does best in hotter conditions. Do not keep Sedum rubrotinctum outside in freezing temperatures. Take the jelly bean plant inside and display it in an indoor garden for the winter. Keep it by a western- or southern-facing window.

Fertilizer: Fertilize in the spring and summer once a month with a cactus and succulent fertilizer.

Pests and Diseases: No insect pests or diseases are known to severely attack this plant.

Propagation: Propagate the jelly bean plant by taking cuttings. Cut off leaves from the stem, let them dry, and then place the cutting into the soil. Keep the potting soil moist until the cutting begins to grow.

Misc. Info: Be careful when touching this succulent plant, as it can irritate some people’s skin. Also make sure that no pets or children eat this plant. Jelly bean plant leaves are delicate and can fall off easily.

<3

Emory

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magical cacti

POTD - Cactus 1“The witching hour, somebody had once whispered to her, was a special moment in the middle of the night when every child and every grown-up was in a deep deep sleep, and all the dark things came out from hiding and had the world all to themselves.”

– Roald Dahl, The BFG

When we purchased our land for The Little Barn just over one year ago, I noticed that among the sand, rose bushes, and caragana trees, were naturally growing cacti. Given that we live in the prairies and experience a harsh climate, I was not aware that our environment could even support a cactus plant if it was not indoors. I quickly dug them up, making three pots in total. Then the machinery went to work and levelled our lot.

I placed the cacti in small, sandy containers and in west-facing windows. However, they did not grow. In fact, the more attention that I paid to them, the more they were shrivelling up and appearing unhealthy. Then Geoffrey and I went away on vacation, and I wasn’t able to water my cactus plants for almost two weeks. I thought that they would surely have died. To my surprise, they no longer looked sickly, but had filled out and began to sprout new growth! 

I was elated! I thought, ‘what funny little creatures. Just when I had almost given up hope, they turn around and come back to life in full force’. I think that my succulents teach me more life lessons than almost anything else in my life right now. They have taught me to slow down, be patient, and take a leap of faith when I’m feeling a need to.

POTD - Cactus 3Or, perhaps I am merely becoming a crazy ca(c)t(i) lady. Regardless, I feel as if there is a sprinkle of magic in my little plants. I only hope that they, among other things, come alive at night when everyone is asleep. Isn’t that a nice thought?

<3

Emory

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try this : terrarium kit

Terrarium Kit DIY 5I first gave mention to this beautiful little Sedum + Moss Terrarium kit three months ago when I received it as a gift from my husband. I was so excited to plant it, but I wanted to wait for the perfect container before I did so. It took me awhile to realize that I had it all along. So rather than having to purchase a new glass terrarium, I merely rearranged some succulents, and voila! Sometimes the best surprises are those that are right under our noses.

Terrarium Kit DIY 1This kit came with everything except for the purple succulent and the river rocks. I had removed the former from another one of my plants. The latter I stole from my parent’s acreage. I was originally going to propagate the purple succulent into a new pot when another ingenious idea struck me. I had a feeling that it would look quite beautiful paired alongside this kit. It turns out that wasn’t wrong. I couldn’t imagine this terrarium kit without one!

Terrarium Kit DIY 3Terrarium Kit DIY 4Now all of my plants friends, both new and old (and stolen), can be together. :-)))

Terrarium Kit DIY 6I really love the way that this terrarium kit turned out. If and when I start to see some growth (the packaging indicates two weeks), then I may have to go out and buy another one. Stay tuned!

<3

Emory

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how to: propagate aloe vera leaves

AloeVera1Last November, I published a post on the growth of my first and only Aloe Vera plant. I learned that if properly cared for, these wondrous cacti can live for decades, and many of you had stories to share of such activity. I was simply amazed!

Before owning an Aloe Vera plant, my knowledge on greenery in general was immensely lacking. This included not knowing what the word propagate meant. Over the last few years, many of my own succulents have come and gone (meaning I bought and accidentally killed them), but this lone plant has continued on, flourishing under my amateur watch. Having just had to repot it into a larger home, I knew that the day was fast approaching that I would also have to remove some of its leaves. To this new feat, I was extremely apprehensive. So I studied up on it, and this is how I learned to propagate Aloe Vera leaves.

AloeVera4-1Step 1:

Cut the leaves off of your plant using either a sharp knife, or scissors. Do so at an angle.

Step 2:

Set the freshly cut leaves aside for 1 week, or until sufficiently scabbed over. The waiting time varies from other succulents. Some websites say to wait no longer than 3 days, while others say to wait up to 2 weeks. I waited 1 week, just to play it safe.

Step 3:

After the bottom of the leaves have scabbed over, you are close to commencing the last steps. However, you will need to apply a rooting hormone to aid in the growth of the leaves. I used organic honey, which I applied generously to the ends of the leaf cuttings.

Step 4:

Now you are ready to plant your leaves. Choose a large pot with sufficient drainage at the bottom. Fill it with soil and plant the leaves carefully. Top off with rocks.

Step 5:

Water sufficiently after a few days. That’s all!

While propagating Aloe Vera leaves is a week-long process, in total the steps take less than 30 to complete. This simplicity has made me a little nervous, and I hope that both my new and original Aloe Vera plant will survive my latest attempt at being a gardener. Fingers crossed!

You can get more information on Aloe Vera at monicashealthmag.com.

AloeVera2On a side note, Geoffrey bought me the cutest gifts for St. Patrick’s Day. This included an owl mug and terrarium start-up kit. I suppose if I butcher my Aloe Vera (please, no!), I will alway have a substitute plant.

Do you have any future tips for me and propagating succulents?

<3

Emory

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have you seen haveheart

IMG_10.jpgHappy Monday, guys! How was your weekend? Did you get up to any 4th of July related activities? Mine was filled with working and taking an impromptu road trip with my husband. For a girl who normally prefers winter over summer months, I am loving how much easier and more fun it is to travel when there is not six feet of snow on the ground! I kind of don’t want the nice weather to go away, ever.

This month HaveHeart Magazine published a DIY of mine that is really great for the summertime. Most of you have seen it already, but here is the link again. Reclaimed wood, plants, dirt, moss, and chicken wire? A plant and sun enthusiast’s haven!

<3

Emory

  • Welcome, friends! My name is Emory. I am a wife and mother to three (two on earth and one in heaven). This is our life on the Canadian prairies.
    email: helloscarlettblog@outlook.com

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