• Hello, friends. My name is Emory. I live on the Canadian prairies with my husband, daughter, and animals. Welcome!
    helloscarlettblog@outlook.com

  • Hello, Instagram

    Our main hall renovation took months to complete. If you would like to read about our process, it's now live #ontheblog. Additional photos can be viewed in my @Instagram stories. 👧🏹🌊
  • Hello, Archives

  • Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 2,415 other followers

remy’s room (again & again)

childs-room-1I think that I may have a problem. A renovation problem. If you all remember, we have already made-over Remy’s room twice. The first time we painted, changed the fixtures, and decorated. Second, we replaced the carpet, painted some more, and rearranged a few things. Yet, it still hadn’t turned out the way that I hoped that it would. I continued to obsess over the room.

childs-room-2I had originally gone for a look that was child-friendly vintage. Given that our home is over 100 years old, I wanted to keep all of the charm. I had used antique crates as shelves, put old toys on display, purchased a retro-looking crib, and more. I was largely inspired by this room. I feel like I had achieved the feel and soul of that room, but it just wasn’t matching the rest of our home. Hence my problem.

childs-room-4After months of looking on Instagram, I started saving pictures of the types of rooms that I was drawn to the most, and I noticed a trend. Rather than filling the walls with crates and “things,” I found that I most envied bare walls. These rooms also had practical children’s furniture, including wicker baskets for toys and books. They were still quite playful, but on a scaled back level.

childs-room-9I decided to take down everything from Remy’s walls and start over. After trying a few different spots, I decided to leave the crib and change table where they were. I removed the London bookshelf and brought up a white storage unit in its place. I put her books in a wicker basket and toys in the trunk.

childs-room-3-1I only hung a few things back onto the walls. I kept Buck Jr. and Buck Jr. Jr., which was my Gedo’s. I also hung the antique clipboard that has a racoon hat from Colorado and wooden gun from Waskesiu. Beside it is the bird hook that we were gifted upon moving into our home, and my favourite bib from babybbasic. Her ultrasound pictures are above her change table.

childs-room-5I ended up reusing our Waterfall Ruffle Shower Curtain from Urban Outfitters as her window curtain. I had wanted to purchase this one, but since it was on back-order and our shower curtain was just laying around, I thought that it might look good in her room. I was right! I actually prefer it covering a window.

childs-room-7Finally, I purchased a black, industrial shelving unit to hold everything that was in the crates. I think that it really suits the room, and it makes it look much tidier. I think that overall the new look is more of a Scandinavian nursery.

childs-room-8Hopefully this will be the last post on her room, at least for awhile! Now to get back to renovating the main floor.

<3

Emory

Hello, Followers:
Blog // Instagram // Pinterest // Twitter

remy’s room (part two)

remys-room-makeover-4Happy New Year, all!

Remember this post? The one that I published over two months ago saying that we made-over Remy’s room? Well, we’ve changed it yet again.

remys-room-makeover-1Above is a before photo.

remys-room-makeover-2This was the first make-over.

remys-room-makeover-4This is what her room looks like now.

remys-room-makeover-5These changes occurred over Christmas. While I was painting our bathroom (that we are also renovating), I started to compare that room’s shiny white baseboards to Remy’s ugly, beige baseboards. I felt guilty that her room was unfinished like that, so I told Geoffrey that over the holidays, I would also tackle the trim and doors in her room. The problem was that the old carpet rose quite high, and was too thick and stiff to either tape it off or to lay any protective material down so that I could paint the bottom of the baseboards. I knew that it would have to be ripped up.

After finding a great carpet store, I went in and explained my situation. We were initially going to tear out the carpet ourselves. I wanted to see the condition of the hardwood floors that were underneath. Our home is over 100 years old, so we are lucky in that most rooms have hardwood as their original flooring. This is something that I hope to expose and refinish someday soon. However, we wanted a quick fix for Remy’s room, and so we decided to stick with carpet. After peeling back the old stuff, we saw that the underlay had essentially turned to dust. We then agreed to get the carpet installers to tear it out in addition to installing the new flooring.

remys-room-makeover-6Everything went incredibly quick and smooth. I chose a dark grey carpet a few days before Christmas, and they came the morning before Christmas Eve to put it in. It went off without a hitch. Over the next few days I painted her room (in between visiting and hosting family), and decorated it in the dark after she went to bed on Boxing Day. That brings us to today!

The carpet and paint are two more huge improvements. Now I can officially cross her room off my to-do list for good. Hooray!

<3

Emory

Hello, Followers:
Blog // Instagram // Pinterest // Twitter

a reclaimed journey

TLB 1A Reclaimed Journey – Building Our Home With Recycled Materials

By Emory Ann Kurysh

When the idea to build our home first came to light, the goal was to make it look like a heritage barn conversion, primarily built from reclaimed materials. The benefits in doing so were vast and varied, not the least of which involved embracing our own creativity and challenging ourselves in the implementation of the design ideas.

Part of our motivation was driven by the knowledge that salvaging building materials cuts down on landfill waste and is environmentally impactful. Another factor is that the cost of recycled materials generally runs much lower than their newer counterparts, and reclaimed materials instantly add a sense of character that can’t easily be accomplished in new constructions. 

Ours was not a journey of how a completely recycled home came to be, but rather a lesson learned on the reality of using secondhand building materials.

The Big Picture

In planning our home, the most dominant design feature was to make use of reclaimed barn wood siding. But early into our build this became apparently difficult.

The first issue we ran into was that the lengths of the reclaimed boards were not long enough to run either horizontally or vertically without showing significant breaks. The second issue lay within the condition of the wood itself. It was extremely weathered, which was our initial draw to it, but would require significant work to prevent further deterioration to use it on the exterior of the home. The fear being that over time it would be exposed to issues such as accelerated rot, infestation and warping.

So we had to create a new strategy to get us the look we envisioned, but with a new durable material.

The decision was reached to use untreated rough-cut pine in place of the barn wood. Although it wasn’t originally in the plan and budget, this decision turned out to be the most aesthetically pleasing and soundest option.

Taking it Inside

The theme of recycled wood continued within the interior of the home. The handrail for the staircase was also to be constructed of barn wood. All of the balusters, guardrails, and posts were to be fabricated from pine, running horizontally. When we installed the staircase, we learned that it is against building code standards as the guardrail was deemed to be ‘climbable’. So yet another major design plan was discarded. The solution involved raw materials in the form of large, rough-cut beams and rebar. Again, this major alteration increased the budget. However, it provided a more stable handrail that was wholly unique and justly fitting for the overall look.

The ceiling was the third and final compromise in the use of reclaimed materials. The plan was for recycled metal roofing to be hung instead of drywall to reinforce the heritage barn concept. It would have saved on time, future maintenance and cost.

After conducting an extensive and unsuccessful search for a large quantity of reclaimed metal, the idea was scrapped.

It turned out this was for the best. Research later revealed that a metal ceiling would more than likely have created poor acoustics and could have affected resale value. It was ultimately the contractor’s suggestion to install a tongue and groove ceiling. A pine ceiling would not only be a quicker install than drywall, the wood would add strength and would be visually much more appealing.

Vintage Lighting

To stay true to the original design we were able to source vintage lighting for the exterior of the home. Five large, gooseneck, gas station lights were purchased from an online retail store dedicated to selling refurbished lighting. We found this to be more fitting than using modern fixtures. We liked that they would be unique to the home and that it would cut down on landfill waste.

Repurposing the Reclaimed

Rather than being used for its intended purpose, the barn wood that was gathered was eventually used in numerous projects around the home. The majority of the wood was repurposed for various storage solutions.

The reclaimed fir and other recycled wood was cut down and hung in every closet and pantry, and in the bathroom and bedroom as shelving. Various pieces of furniture were constructed out of the antique pine and fir. Two dog beds were custom-made from old pallets and casters. In some rooms, long pieces of shiplap were used as the trim.

The Journey

As first-time homebuilders, we understood going into this project that many of the design plans would either be modified in some way or altogether scrapped. Rather than using mostly reclaimed materials on the exterior and within the house, the end result was an amalgamation of new and raw materials.

We found the best impact in using recycled materials came from using these materials within the interior decoration of the home. Having these details within every room unquestionably added the character we were looking for in our new construction.

We achieved our one-of-a-kind heritage barn-inspired home by blending new with wonderful reclaimed and recycled materials which allowed for a quicker build, and a more solid house. While we learned a number of lessons along the way, the challenge we presented ourselves with at the onset of the project pushed us to look at every aspect of the building process to see how we could make an environmental impact.

TLB 2To read the article in its entirety, or to see more from the summer issue of Saskatoon HOME Magazine, please click here.

<3

Emory

Hello, Followers:
Blog // Instagram // Pinterest // Twitter

home: an enchanted forest (florian)

IMG_2395Hey! My name is Wren and I am so excited to share my home with you today! I live in a three-bedroom home on an acreage with my handsome husband, beautiful children, and a menagerie of animals. I am a photographer/musician/designer and I have a blog called “Florian“. There I mainly post my photographs, with little ramblings about life. Thanks so very much to Emory for inviting me to come over and show some photos of our place. It has been a big project for our family for the past few years and so it is nice to be at the point where we can share some of our progress. There is still a ton left to do, but it’s home for us for now and we love it! Hope you enjoy.

IMG_2373Where is your home located?

Our home is located in a beautiful little forest near a meandering stream with a wooden bridge running over it. There are woods, fields and orchards all around, with amazing views from the nearby hilltops. The big old trees standing around our home shade us nicely in summer and keep us cool. Then they thin their leaves enough in the fall and winter to let lots of sunlight in when we need it the most.

IMG_2375Wild animals wander through our property all year round and we have enough space to have a large vegetable garden in the back (with a fence around it of course). We also like to have bonfires and camp-outs in the farthest reach of our property that makes us feel like we are far away from it all.  I even have a swing up there that I like to visit whenever I need a few moments to unwind and feel like a kid again. We also have the perfect toboggan hill for the winter, which I am pretty sure is the main reason our kids agreed to our place when we first saw it! It’s a pretty great location with lots of natural beauty and of course the necessary amenities within close reach. We looked a long time before buying our home and really thought about what we wanted from our property. I think we lucked out and found a great spot for our family for right now.

IMG_2710IMG_2363What are your thoughts on the idea of ‘home’?

I think my motto is “home is where the heart lies”. I have moved and travelled a lot throughout the years so ‘home’ has meant a lot of different things at different points in my life. (Once I got married and had kids, I kept on moving only with more stuff and people to tow along!) Because I have lived in so many places and homes, I think my approach to making a house into home has become pretty straightforward. Home for me is wherever my husband and kids are, where we make our space comfortable and functional, and where we create memories together. I like to set up my furniture, art and instruments right away whenever we settle into a new space, which makes things feel familiar. But it is honestly not about stuff for me when I think of home. It is more about the feelings of nostalgia that you get whenever you bake an old cookie recipe from your childhood. Or when you smell wood smoke and remember all those times you sat by a wood stove or bonfire with the ones you love. It’s how you feel when you get out decorations from the attic to get ready for the holidays. That is ‘home’ to me. The good stuff in life that you share with the people you love the most. It’s also a safe place to relax and unwind away from it all. We named our property “the hide out” for a reason. It’s a place that we feel hidden away and happy in, with space to play and to work on projects, celebrate holidays and enjoy our time together. 

IMG_2292What kinds of things influence your design style?

I am a fan of mid-century modern and Scandinavian design, so I tend to gravitate towards that look. We also have a lot of different eras of vintage furniture and collectibles in our home, which set a certain tone with their aesthetic and colour palettes. As far as an overall look in a space, I love the graphic quality of black and whites with bright colour thrown in to contrast. I think my tastes in design are pretty similar whether it be in home design, photography, or fashion, etc. My photos are the best (I think) when they are more graphic looking, I wear a lot of black and white in my wardrobe, and I have noticed that my home is increasingly looking more like this as well. I have been told that I am “daring with colour” in my home, which I suppose is true in some ways. However, most of our walls are white, except for an occasional accent wall. The floors are also all painted/tiled/carpeted white throughout the house. This was a choice I made because I knew that it would allow the space to breathe and feel light, as well as leave room for the colourful pieces that I wanted to showcase. (And no, it isn’t super hard to keep clean! It requires about the same level of cleaning as any floor surface does.)

IMG_2297A really colourful choice that I made was on my kitchen cupboards which are from Poggenpohl. The colour they are is called “fluorite” from a line the company did based on minerals. Essentially it is this delicious citrus green. I loved them the minute I saw them, but I think some people would shy away from putting in such strong colour on so much area. They work really well though and add a lot of life to the space. We had all white walls initially in the kitchen, but I pushed for the main wall to be painted black and I am so happy that we did it. It makes the space feel substantial and shows off the chrome and stainless steel in the room (like my industrial sink!).

IMG_2327Change is good with design, and honestly I think that the evolution of a space is often the most interesting part. I have found that too much of one style tends to make a space into more of a museum than a livable home. I really like the sparseness and space of mid-century modern, but it has proven to be a bit too cold for daily life with a family. My husband and kids have pushed for more soft furnishings, so we have compromised a bit on some of our furniture. I have gotten rid of some of the vintage pieces that I loved, but were not comfy or durable enough to keep. Our bright blue couch is a departure from the usual style/shape I choose in furniture, but it is super cozy and perfect for curling up on with a good book, so it works great for our family room.

IMG_2306Having kids and pets also adds a lot of clutter and commotion to life which has led me to realize that striving for a ‘perfect’ room with pristine furniture and no toys/books/art supplies/shoes laying about is like shoveling in a snow storm. I am not going to ever get it finished, no matter how hard I try!  I do daydream of all white furniture with lots of teak, but my puppy likes to chew wood and my kids have spilled on almost every piece of furniture I own. I guess my design style is best summed up as “aspiring for clean/functional/fun- with a good dose of having a family friendly surfaces.” 

IMG_2760What do you consider to be one of your favourite items in your home? What could you never live without?

Other than my family, which I could never live without, I suppose my favourite items in my home are my musical instruments. We have moved far and wide and left behind many a sofa/chair/coffee table, but we always take our instruments. My husband and I are both musicians and have built up a collection of instruments that we play regularly and are, I think, a beautiful part of our space.  I feel like it is home when we get the instruments all set up and arranged. The drum kit takes up a lot of space but I also just feel that I want to live in a house that has a drum kit in it. Our kids love playing music too, which I think is invaluable for them to experience. They have learned to feel comfortable around things like violins, banjos and sitars from an early age, which I hope will lead them to having music in their lives as they grow. It’s something we really value in our home. It makes our house feel more like a ‘home’ to me whenever we play music together. 

IMG_2286Please share any ideas/stories/pictures that best highlight your home.

Well, our home has been a real “labour of love” for our family. We bought it a couple of years ago and have worked incredibly hard on it since then. I mentioned earlier that we loved the property and surroundings when we found our place. The other part of that story is that the house itself was in terrible condition and needed an immense amount of work to get it up to current living standards. We literally started out camping in a tent for a few days when we moved in because the house was in such dire straights. But with a lot of elbow grease, a couple of large dumpsters, and lots of dreams we have been able to make our house into a space that works for our family. There were definitely moments where I thought we had bitten off more than we could chew, but it has all been a great learning experience that allowed us to make our house into what we want and need. We had some excellent work done by electricians/gas fitters/installers etc. on the things that needed inspection and certification, but other than that we have done a lot ourselves. This has meant that we get to think about what we are doing and make sure it works, which is wonderful. But, it has also meant that things have taken a bit longer because it’s been us doing it rather than some big crew rushing though. Sometimes we had to wait to do something because it was outside of what our budget would allow. Or we had to find the right materials and it took a lot longer to do that than we had planned. Often we had to stop and reassess where we were heading with a plan and decide if we were making the right choices. It was harder than I first thought to make some of the decisions, although it was super fun at other moments too. I would say that the kitchen part was the worst for me simply because it is such a central part of our home and it seemed to take so very long to complete. I knew what I wanted with the lay out and design, but it was a process to get it all set up. (It took forever to find a fridge that fit properly and didn’t take over the entire space!!) In the interim, we still had to make meals in it, which was pretty tough some days.

IMG_2305Overall, our home has become a lot of what I envisioned when I first saw it. It is open and bright and looks out onto our property with big windows. The children’s rooms are finished enough that I feel good about them, finally!!  My bathtub is exactly the big and luxurious type that I wanted; I just had to wait a little while for it. The plans that we have for the rest of our home are exciting to look forward to. We have worked hard on this house with our little budget and our big hopes and dreams, and it has taught me a lot. I have grand designs for an art cabin in the back of our property where I can write, paint and play music. I am hoping that next spring it will be time to get that project going. I know that it will be a snap to do compared to what the rest of the house has been. I feel like we can do pretty much anything now due to all that we have accomplished.

IMG_2740As I said before, there is still a ton to do on our house, but it is getting there and we are really loving what we have made it into. I suppose that that is what I would say is the biggest thing I’ve taken away from this whole experience; dream big, work hard and keep your chin up. Things tend to work out all right if you do those three things. Yay!! for dreaming big! 

IMG_2285Thanks so much Emory for inviting me to share my little home! It was so much fun!

Love Wren.

If you would like to take part in this series, entitled Home, please email me at helloscarlettblog@outlook.com.

Hello, Followers:
Blog // Instagram // Pinterest // Twitter

diy antler motif.

IMG_5.jpg

this project is one that i had actually created at the beginning of the summer. because it was so simple, i felt like maybe my followers would not care to see how it was done. after months of being on the back burner, and because the end of summer is nearing, i thought that i had better post now! it’s better late than never, right?

you will not need very many supplies for this project. there are also many different ways that you can go about making an antler motif. i sort of cheated with mine when i kept the cutout for this guy and was able to use the cardboard as a ready-made stencil. obviously, you will have to make your own stencil if you haven’t yet purchased buck jr. from urban outfitters. (that, or hand paint the antlers on!)

IMG_1.jpg

step 1: start with some wood

IMG_2.jpg

step 2: use a suitable stencil

IMG_3.jpg

step 3: spray paint the stencil onto your wood

IMG_4.jpg

step 4: let dry, and hang your artwork up for all to see!

IMG_6-7

as a bonus, you can ask your significant other to straighten your newest diy so that you can photograph it for your blog. then, when he is stepping back over the fence, get him to trip and fall and bend the fence, and then proceed to photograph him instead. ;-)))

p.s. did you like this diy post? if the answer is yes then click ‘like’, or better yet, leave me a comment!

sign-2013-5-18-12-20-12

%d bloggers like this: