kinfolk : a coffee menu

Kinfolk_Vol15_CaffeinealaCarte-2Words by Liz Clayton. Top Photograph by Gentl & Hyers. Bottom Photograph by Emory Ann Kurysh. Food Styling by Camille Becerra.

Everything in your life can be coffee if you really want it to be. It just makes sense. Coffee, and its ability to somehow soothe and vivify at the same time, provides a through-line in so many of our lives. From unconsciousness into morning, it sparks creativity at work and later revitalizes us for the playtime that comes after. So why limit its gifts to those of imbibement? Coffee, whether it’s in your body, on your body or simply near it, can surround you with its comfort in so very many ways.

Beyond merely drinking this magical elixir, there are myriad ways to consume it. In fact, coffee was originally eaten rather than brewed. According to ancient legend, there was a goatherd named Kaldi whose dancing, leaping charges revealed that the source of their jubilation was grazing on the fruits of the wild coffee bushes of Ethiopia. In modern times, we’ve figured out a more bingeable, chocolate-enrobed version of this stimulant, and infusing food with coffee has only become more elegant as chefs learn more about the subtlety and variation of roasts and origins. It’s a natural fit in beer: The sweet deep tones of a sultry roasted coffee can be perfectly suited to the palates of porters or chocolatey stouts. Ground espresso has found its way into spice mixes for delectable meat rubs, combining beautifully with ingredients such as cocoa, Tellicherry pepper and sumac. Coffee and cheese also make surprisingly friendly bedfellows (you’ll find it in aromatic rinds and other mysterious places), and let’s not forget the supreme expression of coffee in any proximity to ice cream.

Coffee can be all around you in the home too. You can put it on your furniture—on purpose, even—as a gentle-tinted wood stain, or apply it with a small brush or swab as a scratch cover. Spent coffee grounds can clean and scrub your pots and pans, and what’s more, they can do the same for your skin: Moistened coffee grounds either used on their own as a skin exfoliant or incorporated into lotions as part of a stimulating coffee massage therapy treatment are credited with stimulating circulation and transmitting their anti-oxidant benefits to the skin. It also has heaps of beneficial uses in the garden from general-purpose composting to intentionally rebalancing your soil’s acidity. Want to change the color of your hydrangeas? Coffee grounds are here to help you go from white to blue.

And if coffee has awakened your artistic side after all that cooking, gardening and spa therapy, anything leftover in the pot makes a lovely watercolor-like paint. It’s a classic aid in creating an antique effect on paper—just remember, would-be historic-document forgers, that your papers will smell revealingly, deliciously like what you’ve been brewing all along.

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kinfolk : red velvet lava cakes

Kinfolk_Vol17_TheBloodMenu-2Recipe by Diana Yen, Photograph by Anders Schønnemann, Styling by Mikkel Karstad & Sidsel Rudolph. 

Invented at New York’s Waldorf Astoria in the 1930s, red velvet cake is adored by the masses. In this interpretation, molten chocolate turns into gooey lava as it oozes from the center of this soufflé-like cake.

Red Velvet Lava Cakes

Ingredients:

For the Ganache
4 ounces (115 grams) semisweet chocolate chips
¼ cup (60 milliliters) heavy cream

For the Cake
4 ounces (115 grams) bittersweet chocolate, chopped
¼ cup (55 grams) unsalted butter, cubed, plus more for greasing
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
¼ teaspoon salt
3 large eggs
½ cup (100 grams) granulated sugar
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 teaspoon red gel-paste food coloring
Confectioners’ sugar, optional

Method:

For the Ganache
Place the semisweet chocolate in a small heat-proof bowl. In a small saucepan, warm the cream over medium-high heat until it just begins to boil. Pour the cream over the chocolate, let stand 2 to 3 minutes for the chocolate to soften, and then whisk until smooth. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until set, about 1 hour. Using two teaspoons, form 6 balls of ganache, spacing them out on a parchment-lined tray. (The leftover ganache can be warmed and served with the finished cakes, or kept in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks, or in the freezer for up to 3 months.) Freeze the ganache balls until solid, about 1 hour, or they can be wrapped tightly and kept in the freezer for up to 3 days before using.

For the Cake
Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C) and adjust the oven rack to the middle position. Grease six 4-ounce (120-milliliter) ramekins or 6 cups of a standard muffin tin with butter and coat them lightly with flour, tapping out excess. Place them on a baking sheet and set aside.

In a small saucepan, stir together the bittersweet chocolate and butter over medium-low heat until just melted. Remove from the heat and whisk in the flour and salt until well combined.

In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, or in a medium bowl using a handheld electric mixer, beat the eggs. Slowly add the granulated sugar and continue mixing until the eggs are foamy and pale in color, 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in the vanilla and food coloring. Pour in the melted chocolate mixture and use a rubber spatula to stir until just combined. Divide the batter evenly among the prepared ramekins.

Place 1 ball of ganache into the center of each ramekin, taking care not to press it all the way to the bottom. The goal is to have it immersed in the center of the cake. Use a spoon to smooth the batter over the ganache.

Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, until the tops are just set. Set aside to cool for 2 to 3 minutes. Loosen the edges of the cakes with a butter knife, and then turn them out onto individual plates, or onto a baking sheet if using a muffin tin. Dust with confectioners’ sugar and serve immediately with more of the warmed ganache* on the side, if desired.

*To warm the leftover ganache, place it in a heat-proof bowl over a pot of gently simmering water and stir until melted.

Serves 6

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the family issue : kinfolk

The following text is found on the WELCOME page of Kinfolk’s latest publication, Issue Seventeen. 

Our concept of family is deeply personal and forever evolving. For some, it could mean mom’s knowing glances, your partner’s gentle chiding or grandpa’s turkey gravy. For others, it could be found across the hedge you share with your neighbour, in the reciprocal banter you relish with friends or the unrequited love you have for your cat. The common thread is that the people we consider to be our family encourage us, teach us and care for us, for better or worse, in sickness and in health, till death do us part (or at least until our childhood bedrooms get turned into guest rooms).

The Family Issue of Kinfolk explores the relationships that we have with our nearest and dearest, in all of their iterations. We ask some big questions: How is photography changing the way we construct our family narratives? Should we feel guilty about speaking to our barista more than our sister? And did our parents actually have any idea what they were doing? Each family has its ups and downs, but by recognizing the imperfect nature of our ties, we can work to better both our relationships and ourselves. As George Bernard Shaw said, “If you cannot get rid of the family skeleton, you may as well make it dance.”

What we discovered is that there are as many possibilities for the way we turn out as adults as there are child-raising philosophies, educational systems and organic baby bootie makers (there really are a lot of the latter, too). No matter what kind of family we come from or the type of family we want to create ourselves, there’s no longer a universal concept of “normal.” There’s no ubiquitous manual to consult, rules to follow or boxes to check. Well, maybe just a few: love, understanding, empathy and support. And perhaps a little patience.

Words by Nathan Williams and Georgia Frances King. Photograph by Emory Ann Kurysh. 

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kinfolk magazine : my beside table (the fashion designer)

Kinfolk_Vol16_BedsideTableFashionDesigner-1My favourite magazine, Kinfolk, semi-regularly publishes a series entitled “My Beside Table.” It is within these articles where the reader is allowed to glance into a bedroom and a world that is different from theirs. It is a seemingly uncomplicated concept, but one that I personally love exploring. The accompanying photograph rarely shows the actual bedroom itself, which only enhances the fun in fantasizing what the real space looks like. While I admit to never considering it before, I feel as if a beside table would say a lot about our personalities and lifestyle. Here is the most recent issue’s beside table.

Tell me, what would we find on yours?

Emory

STARR HOUT, WHO COFOUNDED THE NEW YORK–BASED FASHION BRAND APIECE APART WITH HER FRIEND LAURA CRAMER, TALKS ABOUT HER EVENING RITUALS AND HOW SHE’S MADE HER BEDROOM KID-FRIENDLY. 

There’s nothing in my bedroom except a bed, a crib and two side tables. I consider it a sanctuary and sacred space. I like to keep work away from my bed, which means no notebooks, sketchpads or pens. I’ve learned to keep my phone away from my sleeping area too—preferably in the other room, which helps us all sleep through the night. This really helps with putting my mind at ease and ensures that I’m not checking my notifications or responding to messages just before I go to bed. I like to shower before bed in order to wash the day away, then I try to feel grounded through stillness and meditation, which usually calms my nerves for a solid slumber.

It’s pretty important for me to have a bedside table with sufficient space to put various objects, so smaller tables just won’t do. I chose a nightstand that’s roughly the same height as my bed, which maintains the plane and makes it easy to retrieve things: It’s a tray table, complete with an Anglepoise lamp and a Braun clock.

A couple of the objects that live on my bedside table are some Aesop hand cream and a meditation singing bowl that doubles as a toy for my little 11-month-old, Finn, who’s drawn to its shiny brass and its ability to make music. While we’ve had to make some changes in our nighttime routines to adapt to a baby’s unpredictable sleep cycle, it’s been a joy changing the bedroom to suit his needs and sharing our space with him. Unfortunately, flowers are too much of a distraction for Finn though, as he loves to touch and often destroy bouquets.

In the morning I’m a firm devotee of Grady’s Coffee in a Robert Blue mug, and in the evening I’m never without a jumbo-size canning jar of water with a spike of coconut water. I don’t snack in bed all that much as it gets too messy, and I like a really clean bed.

When it comes to sleepwear, I favor Apiece Apart’s Peruvian tees or slip dresses, and I adore my white Fog Linen pillowcases and French linen bed sheets from Le Monde Sauvage in Paris. I’m a big fan of white beds and pieces of furniture that are simple, functional and timeless in their beauty. I love the blonde wood, burlap curtains, white linen sheets and sheepskin elements of my bedroom.

I enjoy reading soft, feel-good books before hitting the sack. Some of the ones currently on the table are The Art of Stillness by Pico Iyer, The Everlasting Meal by Tamar Adler and the poetry of Mary Oliver. Before drifting off to sleep, or sometimes in dreams, my mind often returns to my favorite places in nature or sees light sparkling through the leaves and dancing on the sea.

While I’m usually an early riser, I end up spending a lot of time in bed throughout the day thanks to Finn’s nursing schedule. There’s a large tree right in front of our apartment that I love to look at while I’m nursing. I find its wide, generous arms inspiring, refreshing and recharging.

Kinfolk’s take on Starr’s bedside table: Bella Coffee Table by HAY in oak. Piani Table Lamp by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec for Flos in white. Shirt by Zara. Bedspread and glassware by HAY. Books by Samuel Beckett, Simone de Beauvoir and Michael Elmgreen & Ingar Dragset.

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kinfolk recipe : simple tortilla española

Kinfolk_Vol15_LunchBoxTortilla-1Simple Tortilla Española (Kinfolk Magazine)

Also known as a spanish omelet, this tasty dish can be prepared the night before and will provide all the carbohydrates and protein you need to make it through the rest of your workday.

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 small Yukon Gold potato (about 1/4 pound/115 grams), peeled, quartered and cut into 1/8-inch (3-millimeter) slices
1/2 medium yellow onion, halved and thinly sliced
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
4 large eggs
Pinch of nutmeg

Method:

In a 10-inch (25-centimeter) nonstick skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the potato and onion and season generously with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the potatoes and onions are translucent and very tender, 8 to 10 minutes. Transfer the potatoes and onions to a bowl and wipe the skillet clean.

In the same skillet, melt the butter over medium-low heat. Beat the eggs with the nutmeg and pour them into the pan. Cook undisturbed for 1 minute, then spread the potato and onion mixture over half of the eggs in an even layer. Continue cooking until the edges are set and the top is almost set but still moist, 5 to 7 minutes.

Using a spatula, fold the omelet in half to cover the filling, and then fold in half again. Remove the torta from the skillet and let it cool, then cut it in half and pack for lunch.

Tortilla Recipe - Kinfolk 1Recipe & Food Styling by Diana Yen. Top Photograph by Alice Gao. Prop Styling by Glen Proebstel. Bottom Photograph by Emory Ann Kurysh.

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  • Welcome, friends! My name is Emory. I am a wife and mother to three (two on earth and one in heaven). This is our life on the Canadian prairies.
    email: helloscarlettblog@outlook.com

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