learning about butterflies

I follow an account on Instagram by the name of The Hidden Way. Emily is wife to a schoolteacher, and focuses many of her posts on homeschooling. Now I do not homeschool Remy. Being just 3 years old, she probably won’t start preschool or pre-K until she is 4, and kindergarten until she is 5. At this point, I do intend on sending her to school. Having said that, I found one of Emily’s homeschooling posts just too cute and interesting to not try out!

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Soo we’ve been doing a thing. ☺️ We just learned how to fold these origami butterflies and are currently obsessed with making them! We’ve been using our @twigandmoth cards to inspire their designs and it’s been a great way to focus in on all the little details and variations of these fluttery friends ☺️ The butterflies really look 3-D – we love how realistic they look! And they’re so fun to make 🙌🏻 ⁣ ⁣ Swipe to see @twigandmoth’s beautiful butterfly digital download collection that we have in our classroom. And KEEP swiping to see the awesome butterfly book we found at a library sale. 😉 It is chock full of images and info – a great example of a Charlotte Mason living book and a wonderful addition to our home library 😌 ⁣ ⁣ Do any of you school through the weekend? We are definitely looser but usually get up to the school room at least for a bit. Hope you have a great next few days 🥰😊⁣ ⁣ “One more thing is of vital importance; children must have books, living books; the best are not too good for them; anything less than the best is not good enough; and if it is needful to exercise economy, let go everything that belongs to soft and luxurious living before letting go the duty of supplying the books, and the frequent changes of books, which are necessary for the constant stimulation of the child's intellectual life.”⁣ ⁣ – Charlotte Mason⁣ ⁣ ⁣ ⁣ ⁣ ⁣ ⁣ #exploringnaturewithchildren #charlottemasoneducation #childrenseemagic #charlottemason #charlottemasonliving #simplycharlottemason #natureschool #natureplay #reggiokids #wildandfreechildren #wildandfreemama #homeschoolfamily #learningthroughplay #learningathome #schoolathome #homeschoollife #homeed #homeeducation #preschoolathome #homeschool #homeschooling #homeschoolers #homeschoolmom #homeschoolcollective #living_homeschool #welleducatedheart #aquietstyle #takeamoment#childledlearning #nothingisordinary_nature

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The above post was one that was used for a school lesson. I love origami (I used to do it more in high school, but stopped) and Remy loves butterflies, so I thought that I would try it with her. We searched butterflies online since I didn’t have a book at the time, and after picking one out, I created one for her. Then I put the picture in front of her, and she set about recreating its colours through paint.

This was such a simple and beautiful activity. I wasn’t sure how it would go, hence me not being totally prepared. Next time, I will make sure that we go to the library first to get the books, and then come home and make whatever it is that we are learning about. I think that it will be frogs next!

This homeschooling thing isn’t so bad after all. ;-)))

Emory

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try this : prenatal class

Birth Prepardness - 3Prior to becoming pregnant, and when I was still working at the public library, I had always planned on taking a prenatal course. Twice a year the multiple branches would partner with the Prairie Birth Collective group and offer these classes for a period of six weeks. For four years I would watch expecting couples quietly come in, find the meeting room, disappear for a few hours, and eventually emerge looking happy and hopeful. Although we had not yet planned on having children, I thought that it looked like such a nice ritual, all the while being incredibly educational for first-time parents. It was then that I had decided  that one day, we would attend these classes as well.

Birth Prepardness Course-6I ended up getting pregnant less than one month after leaving my position at the library. Five months later, I was back on a weekly basis taking the Birth Prepardness Class with my husband. By then, everyone was well aware that we were expecting, not only because I would visit the branches a few times a week, but also because gossip there spreads like wildfire. Yet, I didn’t mind in the slightest. I adored each staff member that I had ever worked with.

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We began the classes when I was 23 weeks pregnant, and they went into week 28. What I didn’t foresee was gaining the vast amount of knowledge that I did. My sister jokes that I didn’t know that I had a placenta prior to taking the course. That’s not entirely true. I knew that pregnant women have one (since she encapsulates and consumes hers), I just didn’t know what it did or what it looked like. I ended up Googling it one day, which is something that I still regret doing. Luckily, we only had to look at a stuffed fabric placenta in the class!

IMG_0002Placentas aside, I now feel so much more comfortable in being pregnant, knowing what to expect prior to and during birth, and having a rough guide on breastfeeding afterwards. I am also having one of the teachers, who is a doula and birth photographer, photograph the birth (given that most of my family has recently moved away). My sister is going to be in the delivery room as well. These are all big changes. Prior to taking the class, I wanted multiple drugs, a C-section, and only my husband to be present. Now that I am informed, I want a natural birth with no drugs or intervention, and my husband, sister, and doula to assist me. I am also planning on encapsulating my placenta as well! I just won’t look at it until it comes back in pill form. ;-)))

I strongly believe that everyone should take a prenatal class. Especially so if it is through the library. However, I am biased on that last point.

<3

Emory

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spring succulents

IMG_1.jpg IMG_2.jpgIMG_3.jpg IMG_4.jpgIMG_5.jpg IMG_7.jpgIMG_8.jpgIMG_6.jpg IMG_9.jpgEarlier last month I went on a succulent shopping spree. Having killed the majority of my plants over the past year, I feel as if I now have a firm grasp on what not to do when trying to grow succulents. With some extra help from a few friendly workers at Home Depot, and this wonderful article from Kinfolk Magazine, I am feeling effervescent (my word of the day). Lookout, Spring, here I come.

“Often by April the snow has melted, to return to the prairie, one hopes, only for brief periods. It is a season of muted colour that holds a special beauty.”

Emory

The above quote comes from Courtney Milne, Prairie Light

kinfolk

Screen Shot 2014-02-23 at 11.14.23 PMKinfolk_Scent-Of-Salted-Air_v2-10-15-11_04_galleryMarch is a month of new beginnings for me. As of yesterday, I have officially began a new position at work, and I could not be more excited. Although I sort of fell into my job within the library, what being there has taught me, coupled with a sense of accomplishment in that I am actually putting my degree to use, has been invaluable. For the first time in awhile I feel as if I am finally standing on my own two feet. I feel mentally, physically, and financially secure. Although I loathe bragging, I do feel proud about how my hard work and my dedication with life, love, and my career have all paid off. Rather than brushing over this newest accomplishment, I am going to acknowledge it!

This month, I plan to reveal two magazine-related surprises to you. The first is that I have come across and have recently subscribed to the most beautiful and inspiring magazine. From its insanely rich, grainy, and unique photography, to the simplicity yet complexity of the articles, Kinfolk Magazine is, in my mind, the coolest kid on the block. It blows all other magazines like it out of the water. It is untouchable. I now have an overwhelming sense of motivation, and I cannot wait to let my creativity unfold on HSB. I hope that you will continue to stick around so that we can go on this rejuvenation together.

Emory

The above photo was taken by Michael Graydon, Kinfolk Magazine

prairie light (part 2)

IMG_1.jpg IMG_2.jpg IMG_4.jpgIMG_5.jpg IMG_6.jpgIMG_7.jpg IMG_8.jpgIMG_9.jpg IMG_10.jpgIMG_11.jpg IMG_12.jpgIMG_13.jpg IMG_14.jpg“The prairie is not the kind of place that reaches out and plucks at your romantic heart strings, as do the Rocky Mountains or the sea. The prairie is quiet, gentle, and unassuming, with only fleeting moments of passion and drama. But its dominant moodiness makes the times of vibrant colour all the more exquisite! Now I am amused by people who tell me they find the prairie drab and colourless. Granted the prairie can look monotonous if all you do is drive through it at a hundred kilometres an hour. You need to spend time on the prairie to appreciate the many facets of its personality. Even then, you must take time to look and experience its subtle shifts in temperament. Dull, overcast days offer the best conditions to observe the landscape close-up, yet these are the very occasions when we are least likely to give this land its due. When the tones are even, devoid of bright highlights, or distracting shadows, we can better appreciate the subtle nuances of colour. 

“The prairie is a land of extremes, an immense land that touches all who inhabit it. Neither city nor town offers sanctuary from nature’s dominion. Prairie skies put human architecture in its place; prairie storms recognize no boundaries …

“The immensity of the prairie can overwhelm with a sense of man’s insignificance or offer a profound sense of contentment and peace or exhilarate with a vision of nature’s potency and a grander scheme of things. Whatever the response the prairie will not be ignored … “

– Courtney Milne, Prairie Light

  • Welcome, friends! My name is Emory. I am a wife and mother to three (two on earth and one in heaven). This is our life on the Canadian prairies.
    email: helloscarlettblog@outlook.com

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