yards and yards of gravel

The Little Barn Gravel - 3Hey guys! Well, we finally did it. After a year and a half we took the plunge and ordered gravel for The Little Barn’s driveway. Above is a photograph of how the house looked before the gravel.

Processed with VSCO with a6 presetGeoffrey ended up spreading all eight yards of gravel with merely a shovel and well into a few evenings. This was taken while he was distributing it.

The Little Barn Gravel - 1Now our home no longer looks like it’s been neglected. All we need now is an address sign and fence. Baby steps.

<3

Emory

Hello, Followers:
Blog // Instagram // Pinterest // Twitter

winter succulents : how to care

Processed with VSCOcam with se3 presetBelow is a guide on how to care for your plants during the winter months.

Unless you are lucky enough to live in a location that does not fall below freezing during the winter, many of the most popular and beautiful succulents will need to be brought indoors for the winter. A greenhouse is ideal, but few gardeners have this luxury. Fortunately, most succulents can easily be over wintered indoors.

Succulents encompass a huge assortment of different plants, some of which have very specific needs. However, the tips outlined below will keep most of the commonly grown succulents alive through the winter.

Succulents often have a habit of becoming stretched out and leggy when kept indoors, resulting in weak and ugly plants by spring time. This can be minimized by taking into consideration three important factors when caring for succulents indoors during the winter: light, water, and temperature.

Light is Critical

The biggest factor in keeping succulents alive over winter is light. Too little light will cause succulents to stretch in an effort to get closer to the light source. Succulents, in general, thrive in full sun. This is difficult to provide indoors, but give them as much direct sunlight as possible. A south facing window is best, but east or west windows will work.

Fluorescent lights can be used, if natural light is insufficient. It is important that the plants be kept within 1 to 2 inches of the bulbs. Fluorescent light becomes practically useless to plants at more than 3 inches from the bulbs. Incandescent bulbs are too hot and give off the wrong spectrum of light for plant growth.

Succulents Need Little Water During the Winter

Succulents are always better off too dry, than too wet. This is especially true during the winter when the plants are receiving less than ideal light and cooler than normal temperatures. Keep your succulents on the dry side during the winter. Water just enough to keep the plants from shriveling. In a cool room, you may only need to water once every 10 to 14 days.

Be especially careful to keep the plant itself dry, especially rosette plants like Echeverias. Water will set in the center of the rosette and rot will quickly turn the plant to mush. Remember, the quickest way to kill a succulent is to keep it wet!

Cool Temperatures are Good

Most succulents do not need to be kept especially warm during the winter. The important thing is to not allow them to freeze. 45°F to 55°F is perfect. Keeping the plants cool will keep them in a semi dormant state. A warm location encourages the plants to grow and with the lower light intensity indoors during the winter, results in leggy plants. 

No Fertilizer Needed

Succulents do not need any fertilizer during the fall and winter. You want to keep the plants alive, not encourage them to grow.

These steps have worked very successful for me in over wintering Echeveria, tender Sedum, Aeonium, Agave, Aloe, Crassula, Graptoveria, Kalanchoe, Faucaria, Senecio, and others.

By keeping the plants bright, dry, and cool, they remain in a semi dormant state all winter, with minimal stretching. Once frost-free weather returns, the succulents can be returned outdoors for a summer of basking in the sun.

Words by Josh Spece. Photograph by Emory Ann Kurysh.

Hello, Followers:
Blog // Instagram // Pinterest // Twitter

try this : terrarium kit

Terrarium Kit DIY 5I first gave mention to this beautiful little Sedum + Moss Terrarium kit three months ago when I received it as a gift from my husband. I was so excited to plant it, but I wanted to wait for the perfect container before I did so. It took me awhile to realize that I had it all along. So rather than having to purchase a new glass terrarium, I merely rearranged some succulents, and voila! Sometimes the best surprises are those that are right under our noses.

Terrarium Kit DIY 1This kit came with everything except for the purple succulent and the river rocks. I had removed the former from another one of my plants. The latter I stole from my parent’s acreage. I was originally going to propagate the purple succulent into a new pot when another ingenious idea struck me. I had a feeling that it would look quite beautiful paired alongside this kit. It turns out that wasn’t wrong. I couldn’t imagine this terrarium kit without one!

Terrarium Kit DIY 3Terrarium Kit DIY 4Now all of my plants friends, both new and old (and stolen), can be together. :-)))

Terrarium Kit DIY 6I really love the way that this terrarium kit turned out. If and when I start to see some growth (the packaging indicates two weeks), then I may have to go out and buy another one. Stay tuned!

<3

Emory

Hello, Followers:
Blog // Instagram // Pinterest // Twitter // Facebook

caitlin, graham + little ones

The Hills 02 The Hills 03The Hills 06As part of my sister’s birthday gift, I had offered to photograph her ever-expanding family. Over the years, I have often captured them in groups of two, three, or four, but rarely have I been able to get all six in one photo.

The Hills 08 The Hills 11The Hills 16The Hills 19She was more than happy to accept her gift, and so one beautiful day in October we spent an hour in her backyard sitting, jumping, running, sitting some more, laughing, and most importantly, shooting. Just because photographing four small children isn’t difficult enough, we decided to add their two little dogs in some of the pictures.

The Hills 14 The Hills 24 The Hills 25Almost every photo turned out perfectly. I guess my job was made that much easier since I had such a beautiful family to work with.

The Hills 27The Hills 32Have a good Remembrance Day. I hope that you’re spending it with loved ones.

<3

Emory

a lumberjack and his dog

1.jpg 2.jpg4.jpg 5.jpg6.jpg 7.jpg8.jpg 9.jpg11.jpg 13.jpg14.jpg15.jpg 16.jpgTowards the end of Spring and beginning of Summer, we took a trip to the same national park that we tend to visit for every one of our wedding anniversaries. While we were there during our last visit, I photographed Geoffrey (my husband) and Truman (my dog) in the wilderness. At the time, I was planning on creating my own pet photography business, and I was using them to build my portfolio for documentary-style pictures. After all, cheap subjects are the best subjects. Wait, does that even make sense? Regardless, my plans didn’t really come to fruition over the Summer months like I had intended them to. Mostly because I was too busy with work, travel, or planning our house. More recently, it is because another venture has come up. This is something that I am so excited to share with you all, but not today.

Geoffrey and Truman were incredibly fun and easy to shoot. With a camera, not a gun. With the slim pickings of clothing that he brought on our camping trip, I did my best to coordinate his outfit to fit the Manly Lumberjack look that I was going for. A wool jacket, crew neck sweater, jeans, hat, and dark shoes had to suffice. After studying some animal photography books, I began our session indoors, and eventually took it into the great outdoors where we had more freedom to roam and thus more flexibility within the photographs. We also had waited for an overcast day to help with the mood. During editing, I heightened the contrast, added more green and purple tones, and utilized the zoom and blur features within Photoshop.

The only element that was missing was having a hammock for Geoffrey to lay in. If you are one of the lucky ones that owns a hammock, here are some tips on how to wash them!

<3

Emory

%d bloggers like this: