clay cross planter: diy

I saw a hanging clay planter on Etsy awhile ago, and it’s been on my DIY list ever since. Actually, I’ve always wanted to learn how to throw pots on a wheel. It looks like so much fun! So until I can get my hands on one, here is my rendition of a clay planter. It’s still very fun to create.

Materials

Packaged molding clay
Acrylic paint
Paintbrushes
Toothpicks
Succulent
River rocks
Rope
Rolling pin

Steps

1. Remove the clay from the packaging. Place it on a flat and clean surface. Using a rolling pin, flatten the clay so that it is roughly an inch thick.

2. Now it is time to form a pot. Start with the sides. Determine the height that you would like, then form one cohesive piece of clay that is that exact height. Use the rolling pin to make it smooth. Ensure that the length of this piece will be long enough so that when you bring the ends together, it forms a cylinder large enough to hold your succulent or plant.

3. Take another piece of clay and make it into a circular shape. This will be the base of the pot.

4. Now form a cylinder with the clay in step 3. Gently place it on the base. Attach the cylinder to the base with your fingers. Spend some time blending all of the visible lines on the pot.

5. Using the wooden ends of the paintbrushes, create a drainage hole at the bottom of the pot, as well as two on either side and closer to the top. Make sure that they are wide enough for the rope, and are level with one another.

6. Using the toothpicks, carve crosses into the pot. Once you have completed this, set the pot aside. Let dry overnight.

7. After the clay is completely dry, you may begin to paint it. Start with the base color, covering the exterior and interior of the pot. Once dry, use a different color for the crosses. Let dry once again.

8. Add the succulent and river rocks to the pot. Then take the rope and string it through the two holes on either side of the pot. Knot the ends, and proceed to find a sunny place to hang your new and beautiful creation!

<3

Emory

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how to: propagate aloe vera leaves

AloeVera1Last November, I published a post on the growth of my first and only Aloe Vera plant. I learned that if properly cared for, these wondrous cacti can live for decades, and many of you had stories to share of such activity. I was simply amazed!

Before owning an Aloe Vera plant, my knowledge on greenery in general was immensely lacking. This included not knowing what the word propagate meant. Over the last few years, many of my own succulents have come and gone (meaning I bought and accidentally killed them), but this lone plant has continued on, flourishing under my amateur watch. Having just had to repot it into a larger home, I knew that the day was fast approaching that I would also have to remove some of its leaves. To this new feat, I was extremely apprehensive. So I studied up on it, and this is how I learned to propagate Aloe Vera leaves.

AloeVera4-1Step 1:

Cut the leaves off of your plant using either a sharp knife, or scissors. Do so at an angle.

Step 2:

Set the freshly cut leaves aside for 1 week, or until sufficiently scabbed over. The waiting time varies from other succulents. Some websites say to wait no longer than 3 days, while others say to wait up to 2 weeks. I waited 1 week, just to play it safe.

Step 3:

After the bottom of the leaves have scabbed over, you are close to commencing the last steps. However, you will need to apply a rooting hormone to aid in the growth of the leaves. I used organic honey, which I applied generously to the ends of the leaf cuttings.

Step 4:

Now you are ready to plant your leaves. Choose a large pot with sufficient drainage at the bottom. Fill it with soil and plant the leaves carefully. Top off with rocks.

Step 5:

Water sufficiently after a few days. That’s all!

While propagating Aloe Vera leaves is a week-long process, in total the steps take less than 30 to complete. This simplicity has made me a little nervous, and I hope that both my new and original Aloe Vera plant will survive my latest attempt at being a gardener. Fingers crossed!

You can get more information on Aloe Vera at monicashealthmag.com.

AloeVera2On a side note, Geoffrey bought me the cutest gifts for St. Patrick’s Day. This included an owl mug and terrarium start-up kit. I suppose if I butcher my Aloe Vera (please, no!), I will alway have a substitute plant.

Do you have any future tips for me and propagating succulents?

<3

Emory

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makeup brush holder diy.

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i first came across these inventive makeup brush vases when they were published on free people’s blog. they were so beautiful and seemed like such a great idea. i wondered why i did not think of diy-ing them myself! well now i did.

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you can use almost anything to hold your brushes. jars, bottles, pots, they will all suffice. be creative. have fun! :-)

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  • Hello, friends. My name is Emory. I live on the Canadian prairies with my husband, daughter, and animals. Welcome!
    helloscarlettblog@outlook.com

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