• Hello, friends. My name is Emory. I live on the Canadian prairies with my husband, daughter, and animals. Welcome!
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    This was taken one year ago. It's hard to believe that she was so little. At 2.5 months old, I felt like I had already known her for years. Yet, I still had no idea what I was doing. I was a new mother, and I felt completely on my own. I told myself to take it day by day, and so I did. Somehow, she and I made it through and although she's still so young, our bond today is so unbelievably strong. 
If it's not yet apparent, I'm in an extraordinarily sentimental mood. This morning I found a notebook that I had purchased when @omgkersh and I were seriously considering adoption. I was planning on detailing our journey for our future child. Looking at the date of the receipt, it read 02/25/15. Little did I know that exactly one year later, my daughter would be born on 02/25/16. 
I truly believe that we are constantly being shown signs, we just don't always pay attention. I view what happened today as a reminder to stay strong during times of uncertainty. Things usually work out for the better. I just need to have faith. To say that she has a piece of my heart would be an understatement.
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clay cross planter: diy

I saw a hanging clay planter on Etsy awhile ago, and it’s been on my DIY list ever since. Actually, I’ve always wanted to learn how to throw pots on a wheel. It looks like so much fun! So until I can get my hands on one, here is my rendition of a clay planter. It’s still very fun to create.

Materials

Packaged molding clay
Acrylic paint
Paintbrushes
Toothpicks
Succulent
River rocks
Rope
Rolling pin

Steps

1. Remove the clay from the packaging. Place it on a flat and clean surface. Using a rolling pin, flatten the clay so that it is roughly an inch thick.

2. Now it is time to form a pot. Start with the sides. Determine the height that you would like, then form one cohesive piece of clay that is that exact height. Use the rolling pin to make it smooth. Ensure that the length of this piece will be long enough so that when you bring the ends together, it forms a cylinder large enough to hold your succulent or plant.

3. Take another piece of clay and make it into a circular shape. This will be the base of the pot.

4. Now form a cylinder with the clay in step 3. Gently place it on the base. Attach the cylinder to the base with your fingers. Spend some time blending all of the visible lines on the pot.

5. Using the wooden ends of the paintbrushes, create a drainage hole at the bottom of the pot, as well as two on either side and closer to the top. Make sure that they are wide enough for the rope, and are level with one another.

6. Using the toothpicks, carve crosses into the pot. Once you have completed this, set the pot aside. Let dry overnight.

7. After the clay is completely dry, you may begin to paint it. Start with the base color, covering the exterior and interior of the pot. Once dry, use a different color for the crosses. Let dry once again.

8. Add the succulent and river rocks to the pot. Then take the rope and string it through the two holes on either side of the pot. Knot the ends, and proceed to find a sunny place to hang your new and beautiful creation!

<3

Emory

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hanging geode terrarium kit

terrarium-kit-3A few weeks ago, I ordered this Hanging Geode Terrarium Kit from Urban Outfitters. We had a space on our wall where it would fit perfectly.

terrarium-kit-1terrarium-kit-2I wasn’t sure what to expect with the kit. Geoffrey had bought me a terrarium kit two years ago, and unlike the package had promised, nothing grew. That was a Sedum + Moss kit. This one’s main feature was a geode. It is more or less for decoration, so already I had higher hopes for it in that nothing was expected to grow.

terrarium-kit-5This kit also came with a cute glass vase. It was incredibly easy to put together, and it looks just like the one on the website!

terrarium-kit-7Overall this was a really great purchase, in my opinion. I definitely want a few more to hang around our home. Maybe I’ll get some in April. ;-)))

<3

Emory

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cups and succ(ulent)s

IMG_0024The last time I published a post about our kitchen, we had installed new cabinets and had partially rearranged it. After all of that, I still had not yet achieved the light and airy look that I was hoping for. You know the one. I can usually be found in the IKEA catalogue. White walls. Open shelving. Exposed plates. Greenery. Minimalist. So, I rearranged things once again.

IMG_0043I dragged the massive wire storage unit that we purchased from Home Depot into the kitchen, switching out the antique wooden armoire. After I washed the rack down, I set about arranging all of our plates, cups, and succulents on it. 

IMG_0034IMG_0038I couldn’t have asked for a better fit. It blended in so beautifully. I love how it displays our plates and bowls from Crate & Barrel, our glassware from Anthropologie, our organizers from IKEA, and my collection of over thirty succulents that I have been carefully growing over the last few years.

IMG_0039IMG_0023This is now my favourite corner of The Little Barn

IMG_0059Have a great weekend!

<3

Emory

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winter succulents : how to care

Processed with VSCOcam with se3 presetBelow is a guide on how to care for your plants during the winter months.

Unless you are lucky enough to live in a location that does not fall below freezing during the winter, many of the most popular and beautiful succulents will need to be brought indoors for the winter. A greenhouse is ideal, but few gardeners have this luxury. Fortunately, most succulents can easily be over wintered indoors.

Succulents encompass a huge assortment of different plants, some of which have very specific needs. However, the tips outlined below will keep most of the commonly grown succulents alive through the winter.

Succulents often have a habit of becoming stretched out and leggy when kept indoors, resulting in weak and ugly plants by spring time. This can be minimized by taking into consideration three important factors when caring for succulents indoors during the winter: light, water, and temperature.

Light is Critical

The biggest factor in keeping succulents alive over winter is light. Too little light will cause succulents to stretch in an effort to get closer to the light source. Succulents, in general, thrive in full sun. This is difficult to provide indoors, but give them as much direct sunlight as possible. A south facing window is best, but east or west windows will work.

Fluorescent lights can be used, if natural light is insufficient. It is important that the plants be kept within 1 to 2 inches of the bulbs. Fluorescent light becomes practically useless to plants at more than 3 inches from the bulbs. Incandescent bulbs are too hot and give off the wrong spectrum of light for plant growth.

Succulents Need Little Water During the Winter

Succulents are always better off too dry, than too wet. This is especially true during the winter when the plants are receiving less than ideal light and cooler than normal temperatures. Keep your succulents on the dry side during the winter. Water just enough to keep the plants from shriveling. In a cool room, you may only need to water once every 10 to 14 days.

Be especially careful to keep the plant itself dry, especially rosette plants like Echeverias. Water will set in the center of the rosette and rot will quickly turn the plant to mush. Remember, the quickest way to kill a succulent is to keep it wet!

Cool Temperatures are Good

Most succulents do not need to be kept especially warm during the winter. The important thing is to not allow them to freeze. 45°F to 55°F is perfect. Keeping the plants cool will keep them in a semi dormant state. A warm location encourages the plants to grow and with the lower light intensity indoors during the winter, results in leggy plants. 

No Fertilizer Needed

Succulents do not need any fertilizer during the fall and winter. You want to keep the plants alive, not encourage them to grow.

These steps have worked very successful for me in over wintering Echeveria, tender Sedum, Aeonium, Agave, Aloe, Crassula, Graptoveria, Kalanchoe, Faucaria, Senecio, and others.

By keeping the plants bright, dry, and cool, they remain in a semi dormant state all winter, with minimal stretching. Once frost-free weather returns, the succulents can be returned outdoors for a summer of basking in the sun.

Words by Josh Spece. Photograph by Emory Ann Kurysh.

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make this : tree stump succulent planter

WoodSucculentHolder0In the past, I have dedicated quite a number of posts towards DIY plant projects on Hello, Scarlett. You can view some of the results herehere, and here. I can’t help it. I take so much pride in seeing my little succulents grow, and finding new ways to display them is a hobby of mine.

I first came across these succulent planters on Pinterest. Having already made several do-it-yourself crafts out of tree stumps, as seen here for example, it was a natural decision to find wood, cut it, drill it, paint it, and ultimately turn it into yet another succulent project. These are probably my favourite planters to date.

Wood Succulent Holder 3Materials

Dead/fallen tree/branches
Saw
Drill 
Drill bits
Spray paint
Succulent(s)

Wood Succulent Holder 2Steps

1. Using a saw, cut the dead tree or branches into at least a 5″ x 5″ stump. Make sure the bottom of the soon-to-be planter rests firmly on a level surface.

2. Using a large drill bit, drill halfway down the centre of the stump, hollowing out a sizeable hole. This will hold the succulent.

3. Using a much smaller drill bit, flip the stump over, and repeat on the bottom. Drill until the bit passes through the entire stump. This is a drainage hole.

4. Once the stump has been hollowed out, it is time to paint it. Spray paint is the quickest and easiest paint to for the job. I prefer waterproof spray paint.

Wood Succulent Holder 65. After the planters are dry, it is time to fill them with succulents. Voila!

Wood Succulent Holder 5Wood Succulent Holder 4Another option is to use air plants. They were my first choice, until I remembered how easily I kill them. However, I think that they would look beautiful in these woodsy planters!

<3

Emory

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