pork and beans revisited

Pork and Beans - 2Nearly two years ago, I had blogged about my newest and fastest growing succulent, Pork and Beans. These plants are known as Sedum or stonecrop plants. To date, this specific type of succulent remains my favourite of over the thirty types that I am currently growing. Its delicate leaves have fallen off over the years and have turned into several separate and flourishing plants of their own. I thought that I would share some additional information and care tips about the Pork and Beans succulent. Additional facts can be gained from the Balcony Container Gardening website.

Screen Shot 2016-02-15 at 11.35.39 AMIntro: The jelly bean plant, also called pork and beans, is an interesting succulent plant that displays jelly beanlike leaves. In the summertime its leaves change from green to bright red, and it bears yellow flowers in the springtime. This colorful succulent does best in hot, sunny apartment balcony gardens and will look best as a “ground cover” in plant containers underneath tall plants with a small footprint, such as a jade plant pruned to look like a tree. The jelly bean plant will also look stunning in a short, squat container set on a table or in a hanging window frame-like plant container.

Scientific Name: Sedum rubrotinctum

Plant Type: Succulent cactus

Light: Full sun

Water: Water the jelly bean plant more in the spring and summer, but still let it dry out in between waterings. Plant Sedum rubrotinctum in well-draining potting soil and never let it sit in water.

Zone: Zones 9 to 10

Temperature: This succulent plant does best in hotter conditions. Do not keep Sedum rubrotinctum outside in freezing temperatures. Take the jelly bean plant inside and display it in an indoor garden for the winter. Keep it by a western- or southern-facing window.

Fertilizer: Fertilize in the spring and summer once a month with a cactus and succulent fertilizer.

Pests and Diseases: No insect pests or diseases are known to severely attack this plant.

Propagation: Propagate the jelly bean plant by taking cuttings. Cut off leaves from the stem, let them dry, and then place the cutting into the soil. Keep the potting soil moist until the cutting begins to grow.

Misc. Info: Be careful when touching this succulent plant, as it can irritate some people’s skin. Also make sure that no pets or children eat this plant. Jelly bean plant leaves are delicate and can fall off easily.

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Emory

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pork and beans

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I purchased my succulent Pork and Beans on the first of April. I would normally never write a post about only one of my succulents, but I just love this little plant more than anything! When I brought it home, it looked like this:

Screen Shot 2014-05-18 at 9.20.49 PM

In a little over a month and a half, it has tripled in size. (You can see it now sitting in the middle of the planter box in the first photograph, and in the photograph below.) I am able to track its growth on a daily basis. Never have I ever had such success with any of my other succulents. Mine tend to grow slowly but surely, rather than rapidly and heartedly. One of my followers on Instagram recently asked me what my secrets are to growing succulents. While I touched upon it here, I didn’t go into great detail. Now, I want to tell you what I told her. Here are my essential tips for keeping these types of plants.

Processed with VSCOcam with se3 presetA Growing Guide For Successful Succulents

1. Do not bother to invest in pre-packaged, expensive soil. Rather, choose soil from your garden, or preserve the soil that the succulent came with. Top it off with rocks.

2. Always keep your succulents in small clay pots, even if it looks as if they are outgrowing them. Make sure the pot has a drainage hole.

3. Place your succulents in bright, but indirect lighting. Although they may look resilient, they can also burn very easily.

4. Keep your home at a warm temperature. They do not do well in cool temperatures.

5. Do not water them more than twice a week. Keep in mind, though, that each succulent is different. Based on trial and error, I have learned that certain succulents of mine require watering two times a week, while others are on a biweekly schedule. The majority of them, however, I water them once a week.

6. That being said, make sure that your water has either been distilled or is rain water. Water straight from the tap will not help your plants. Store it at room temperature. 

7. I often read that succulents will need to be fertilized once a month. I tried this once with about six of my succulents, all of which ended up dying shortly thereafter. I do not recommend fertilization, but you may have success with it.

8. Try to have fun with them. Experiment in different succulents, and monitor them each day to see how they are doing. Rotate them when you notice them leaning towards the sun. Water them less often if you see that they are turning black, or more often if they appear to be drying up. Remember, while this list may help you grow your succulents more successfully, it does not guarantee their survival. Try not to stress over them too much, because in the end they are only plants. Even my little Pork and Beans!

Emory

  • Welcome, friends! My name is Emory. I am a wife and mother to three (two on earth and one in heaven). This is our life on the Canadian prairies.
    email: helloscarlettblog@outlook.com

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