home: a creative australian abode (i can do that!)

Photo 5When I wrote that I wanted to feature places from around the world in this new series, I wasn’t kidding. Today, I am happy to bring you an eclectic and lovely home all the way from Australia. Tamara’s blog, I Can Do That!, is pretty much a go-to for any DIY enthusiast. Not only does she attempt to handcraft pretty much everything that you can think of, but she’s also an “optimist, a feminist, an equality-ist, a do-what-you-love-and-be-proud-of-it-ist.” If that isn’t reason enough to give her a follow, then I don’t know what is.

Emory

Photo 11. Where is your home located?

The place that I call home is Melbourne, Australia. Melbourne is a cosmopolitan city that is particularly famous for having amazing restaurants and unpredictable weather.

The suburb where I live was settled in the late 1880s, and has leafy streets lined with plane trees and bluestone gutters, as well as lots of parks and English gardens. It has a more British feel than other parts of Melbourne, but there are still plenty of gum trees and Australian natives around.

Photo 4Photo 22. What are your thoughts on the idea of ‘home’? 

I’ve lived in 10 houses and three countries to date. Maybe because of that, I have struggled to really connect to the idea of any one place being ‘home’. I can’t say that I’ve ever felt a really strong bond with any particular house I have lived in (although after two years in my current home I’m starting to get very attached). Rather, I feel at home when I am with my family and my partner. I also feel a sense of belonging when I am surrounded by some of the things that are special to me – my books. I love to collect books of every genre; firsthand, secondhand, you name it. There are books in every room of our home, and just looking through their pages always makes me feel at home.

Photo 103. What kinds of things influence your design style?

Buying a house with my partner has opened up a whole range of design possibilities that I had never before considered. All of a sudden we had a space that was completely our own – a blank canvas.

Photo 11Photo 9Luckily, we agree on a lot of things, design-wise. We both love second-hand and antique pieces, and this theme permeates our style. Most of our furniture (save for our bed and couch) is second-hand, thrifted or up-cycled, and we love it. So many of the things in our home carry special memories of where we found them.

Photo 8I have always loved creative pursuits, and the majority of our artwork (if you want to call it that!) is homemade. This brings me such a sense of happiness and fulfillment, because I love the feeling of being able to express my personality, our relationship, and the sense of ‘home’ through the way we decorate. No one is ever going to confuse our home for a display home, but you know what? I am totally ok with that.

Photo 134. What do you consider to be one of your favourite items in your home? What could you never live without?

As I mentioned above, my collection of books is something that I treasure deeply and would hate to be without. Sometimes I will sit in front of my bookcase, looking through books I love, reorganizing or just admiring, and it brings me a deep sense of peace.

Photo 15I love our kitchen too. I spend a fair amount of time in there, because I truly enjoy cooking. It’s spacious and laid out really well, with plenty of bench room to spread out on. Cooking for my friends and family is one of the joys of my life. I come from a family of passionate food and wine lovers – you may have noticed some of our wine-related décor in the photos. (We also have a fair amount of cheese related things – it’s the small things in life, you know?)

Photo 17My bed is – of course – a favourite location of mine (I really enjoy sleeping). The rainforest panorama over our bed is something that we bought right after we moved in; I love the sense of depth it brings to the room.

Photo 18And what bed is complete without a resident cat? This is Lara, our birman, who is 14 years old and has also lived in three countries. She’s sitting right next to me as I write – pets really make a house into a home.

Photo 19To me, the most important aspect of our home is that it is ours. It reflects us, together and separately, and it is a haven. The three of us – Mario, cat and I – make our home into something special.

Photo 12Tamara

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home: dreaming big, living small (tiny house teacher)

or PIC 3I could never have successfully done this Home series without having at least one Tiny House featured. For the last year, I have considered these little houses to be the ideal form of home ownership. I find nothing more desirable than to not only live mortgage-free, but to be able to move your lovely abode at a moment’s notice. Coming from someone who is able to commit, but also loves to change her mind, I dream of one day owning a Tiny House. When I do make the decision to build one, I will turn to one of the best teacher’s around, Lora from the blog The Tiny House Teacher.

For some reason, the most compassionate souls seem to follow HSB. Lora is no exception. I have been in contact with her for a few months now, and her goodness, coupled with her knowledge regarding Tiny Homes, never ceases to astound me. It is apparent that she truly loves her life in her tiny abode, and strives to share that expertise with audiences both near and far. She was brave enough to make a major life change, and for that, I am thrilled to share her home story on my blog.

<3

Emory

PIC 21. Where is your home located?

Currently my Tiny House and I reside at an RV park in Georgia. I chose this location because it was close to work, but I am loving it because of everything it has to offer.

It is perfect for the outdoor activities I enjoy, with great hiking trails, a couple of small lakes and stables nearby.

PIC 3But one of the best things about my Tiny House is that I can park it wherever I want in the future! The freedom of knowing I can move anywhere is incredibly liberating and exciting.

2. What are your thoughts on the idea of ‘home’?

My idea of home has always been more about the “feelings” a place evokes rather than the actual building or space. I have lived in 13 different states, 22 cities and 28 houses over the years. I have loved something about each of these homes, but I realize it’s my family and the experiences that I have had in each that made the house feel like a “home” to me.

PIC 4I know a lot of people think about an actual location when they talk about their “home”…and I have always wondered what it would be like to have one place that came to mind. I guess for me, my home is a place that reflects who I am at that moment in life. Right now, that moment looks like a Tiny House!

PIC 5“Home” is the place that has room for all of the things that are important to me. It has a cozy bed to sleep in, a place to cook, a bathroom for showers, and space for all of my passions and hobbies. Which right now include reading, writing, photography, triathlons and ballroom dancing!

PIC 6Home is also a place where I can share memories that are important to me. One of my bucket list items is to run a half marathon in all 50 states. Last year for Christmas, my sister bought me an amazing medal board to showcase all of my race “bling.” When I started making my “must have” list for my Tiny House, it was at the top!

PIC 7Overall, home is a place that feels like me. A space that represents all the things I love. A space that is organized and functional, but also comforting and relaxing. Most of all, my home is a space that encourages me to be thankful for what I have.

3. What kinds of things influence your design style?

My grandfather was an architect and my mom has always loved the designs of Frank Lloyd Wright. I grew up in a home that had clean lines, lots of windows and organized spaces. All of these things stuck and influenced my Tiny House design choices.

PIC 8As I got older, I found myself pulled towards items that were functional and comfortable. I like things to look “clean,” but I don’t connect with spaces that feel too modern or sterile. I want the words cozy and relaxing to come to mind in my home. To me this means a lot of natural materials and comfy furniture.

PIC 9A lot of people ask why I didn’t just move to an RV when I decided to go Tiny. The answer is always the same, “they don’t feel like home to me!” I don’t get a sense of comfort when I walk into an RV, they feel cold, impersonal and kind of cheap.

In fact, I stayed in one for a month before my Tiny House was delivered…and I hated it. Not because of the space, but because it didn’t really feel like me. It was dark, flimsy, and had limited storage. It was all of the things that didn’t appeal to me from a design standpoint.

The final item that influenced the design of my house was my strong need for organization and limited visual clutter. I have always been OCD to a certain extent, and I wanted to have storage spaces for all of the things I wanted to keep. I am not really a minimalist at heart, but I am an organizing fan (in fact, I had my own professional organizing company for 7 years). So as I started looking at designs, I knew I wanted to use all of the space I had effectively.

PIC 10My design list looked something like this…I want a bright space, with lots of windows. It needs to be well constructed and feel like home. I want lots of storage, a functional kitchen and a loft bedroom. Because I knew what I was looking for, I was able to pick a design that met my requirements for light, comfort, quality and storage. And I am thrilled with the results!

4. What do you consider to be one of your favourite items in your home? What could you never live without?

This was the toughest question. Downsizing requires you to do a lot of self-reflection on the things that are important to you, but it’s hard to limit my “favorite” items to just one.

I will say that one of the first things on my “must-keep” list for my Tiny House were my books. I love to read! When I started thinking about downsizing one of the things that made me most nervous was the idea of getting rid of all of my books. I did end up donating over 200 to a local library near my old house, but I also had a custom bookcase made to hold all of my favorites.

PIC 11I also realized that I wanted technology to be part of my Tiny Life. I use my iPad and Computer daily, in part because I am a technology junkie and partly because they allow me to pursue my new found passion for writing and blogging.

I also couldn’t live without my Monkey…he is my traveling buddy and awesome pal. And as you can see, he is quite fond of our Tiny House Life!

PIC 125. Please share any ideas/stories/pictures that best highlight your home.

The first night I climbed in my bed in my Tiny House, I knew I had made the perfect choice. When I climbed up into my loft and looked out at my new space, I felt like a little kid with a treehouse. It was the best feeling ever!

PIC 12AA lot of people asked me what it’s like living with my dog in my Tiny House, and I can say it’s awesome. I own a two year old Australian Shepherd named Rocket and he has lots of energy! But we take lots of walks in the evening and he is adjusting well.

PIC 13About a month after I moved to the RV park, I noticed that some people named their RV’s. I didn’t want my Tiny House to feel left out, plus I really liked the idea of giving my house some personality, so I decided to go on a quest for a name. I posted my challenge on my Facebook and Twitter accounts, and I got tons of great ideas.

I decided on Ma’alahi…which means simplicity in Hawaii. This name resonated with me because it was unique, sounded pretty and because I read my first book about Tiny Houses on a trip to Hawaii. It just seemed like a perfect fit! Now I just have to get a sign for the outside. :-)

PIC 14Lora

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home: on land and at sea (abstract conformity)

_S081259“[He] travels the globe through the merchant marine, visiting lands and cultures abroad yet always finding the experiences even as close as home just as important.”

Aboutabstractconformity.com

Processed with VSCOcam with lv01 presetIt is difficult to recall when, or how, I first came across Abstract Conformity on Instagram. What I do remember about seeing John’s square photography for the first time is thinking, “do people really live like this?” I knew in that moment that I was going to become a fan of  his work. What I didn’t know was that the man behind the lens was a pretty stellar character as well.

When I had initially considered possible collaborators for this new series, one of my first visions was of a home on the sea. With the success of last years series, I knew that I had big shoes to fill. I wanted to bring in artistic people that not only lived a completely different life from my own, but ones that inspired me creatively. I approached John to take part in this new venture, fully expecting to be turned down. His answer was an immediate and resounding yes. He would do it. 

A dozen emails later, still amazed by his kindness, with an even bigger appreciation for his photography skills, and a better understanding of where he comes from, this post is and was finally ready to be published. I hope that each and everyone of you enjoy John’s Home as much as I do.

Emory

_DSF15641. Where is your home located?

My brick & mortar, is located on the outskirts of Houston, TX. For 6 months out of the year my body resides aboard a cargo ship somewhere on the planet’s waterways. Due to traveling, I’ve actually slept more in my bed aboard the ship than in my bed with a mailing address.

_DSF33412. What are your thoughts on the idea of ‘home’? 

Home is a location that evokes comfort and safety. It’s a place where others are welcomed in to share in those feelings, giving the place its title of a home rather than a location. A home need not be of brick and mortar or even stationary for me. I’ve had the opportunity to share with people in their homes across the globe from far-fetched mansions to a room lit by candles hardly larger than the bed frame. In those moments, they were all proud to welcome me in to their “home.” It was their comfort to be shared with others that made it a home too.

DSC_9573DSC_95653. What kinds of things influence your design style?

As a society, we change our clothes each season depending on the evolving weather, but we also alter our wardrobes with new trends. This is seen easily as we move amongst one another so why do homes remain stagnant for such long periods of time? Design aesthetics are a reflection of your mood, which for me change less frequently as the weather but they do change so I kept two tips at the forefront.

_DSF1492First, the space must have the ability for people to move about and interact with both their body and their eyes. If it’s overwhelming, you miss out on the purpose of the elements from distraction which then detracts from the comfort. Second, the items must serve the purpose of telling their own story. This can be a family heirloom to a vintage set of barware to a well crafted gun cabinet, which also happens to be a family heirloom. I’m intrigued by so many various “styles” that if I stick with the first two steps they seem to flow. 

DSC_9588DSC_95784. What do you consider to be one of your favourite items in your home? What could you never live without?

For me, all of it is replaceable. They evoke their own emotions and I’m not hoping to lose anything, but once they’ve been in my life the memory is contained within me forever, so the physical element could vanish but the memory of that experience never will.

DSC_9601DSC_9598It’s difficult to narrow to just one, so I will give three for various purposes. My Pendleton blanket, although two years old is a prized piece. It warms me on the couch, lays out on beaches for picnics and travels to globe with me on the ship. That blanket is comfort in more than just physical. My turntable connects generations with its ability to produce sound. I have records from my grandparents up to shows my wife and I saw two months ago. Music is the soundtrack to live and the tangible aspect of the turntable allows me to slow down and appreciate those tunes. Finally, a cast iron skillet that my great grandmother owned is vital. Just as its fed generations of my family, we’ve carried it on road trips to feed others. When I’m not on the ship, it resides on the stuff with extensive use beginning with my morning bacon and eggs just as my great-grandmother cooked for us when we visited. 

DSCF66255. Please share any ideas/stories/pictures that best highlight your home.

My current brick & mortar is going through changes as we bought it at 24 and now at 30 our values have clearly changed to more purpose beyond filling a void in the house.

_DSF1572

John

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home: the little barn (hello, scarlett)

Home Series 1The day has come for me to commence my newest series, Home. This project emanated from our exhausting search for a new property in 2014. During which, I came to question my own views on the idea of ‘home’. Only recently have I come to understand that I had the wrong mentality all along. It was therefore inevitable that I turned this year-long journey into a new series. 

Readers, you have been so patient and so kind in sharing my house-building adventure with me. I truly hope that it was worth the wait! So without further delay, I present to you the very first and complete tour of The Little Barn.

Home Series 8Home Series 3Where is your home located?

The Little Barn is located in a Provincial Park area in Saskatchewan, Canada. It is surrounded by trees, dirt roads, few neighbours, a school, and a lake which can be seen from our second storey. It’s incredibly picturesque.

Home Series 4Home Series 5What are your thoughts on the idea of ‘home’?

My personal views on the idea of a home have changed so drastically over the last few years, and I feel as if this series was born from my modified ideology. Before I was married, I never gave much thought to where or what I considered to be my home. I just innately knew that it was wherever my parents were. From Saskatchewan to Northwest Territories, my home was associated with with my family, and not a physical structure nor specific city. This was also the case when I relocated to Switzerland after obtaining my university degree. I had an apartment, a job, and friends in that country, but I never settled in to the point that it was my home.

Home Series 7Home Series 9After meeting and marrying my husband, we immediately moved to a new city in a neighbouring province. We made the decision to keep our condominium in Saskatchewan and to rent it out while we were living elsewhere. Even though we were living in Alberta, I constantly referred to Saskatchewan as home.

Home Series 10 Home Series 11Less than a year later, I moved back to Saskatchewan while my husband continued his schooling in Alberta. I never really felt like I had ever settled into that city, and couldn’t wait to come back to our condo and resume my jobs that I had before we had moved. I also hated the idea of becoming a renter again. At that point, I began to regard a physical space as my home over where my family was living. Whatever kind of day that I was experiencing, I felt safe whenever I entered the doors of my house, and that all was right with the world. It helped that I also had Holly with me. Eventually, my husband moved back, and we bought Little Green shortly thereafter. Owning that little abode solidified the concept that a house is my home, and not so much my immediate friends or family. To me, it was all about the building itself.

Home Series 12 Home Series 13A year and a half into owning Little Green, we began our search for another house. Specifically, one on an acreage. This is what kicked off the journey for what eventually became The Little Barn, and one that my readers got to experience alongside with me. Five months into our search, we were even more confused with what we were looking for than before we had even started. If we loved the house, we hated the land. If we loved the land, we hated the house. If we loved both, it was over 40 minutes outside of the city. We just couldn’t find our perfect home. I felt lost, desperate, and began second guessing if we would ever find anything that suited our needs and budget. However, we persisted. In what felt like the eleventh hour, we ended up finding a lot in a provincial park, and thus TLB came to be. Although it wasn’t an acreage, it was still in the country (which we liked), and was destined to be a beautiful home (which we loved). We thought that it was going to be a happy ending to our house story.

Home Series 14 Home Series 15While we were building our new home, we lived on my parent’s acreage in my Baba’s  house for seven months. I didn’t realize it at the time, but living there, on several acres located just outside of the city was the precise home that we were searching for all along. Only after moving into The Little Barn did I realize that I had the whole idea of a home and what I really wanted was entirely wrong. I discovered that it’s neither the house itself, nor is it much the community that it’s in that’s what is important. To me, home is Saskatchewan and my family. I am and always will be a prairie girl. I am humble and quiet but constantly have a storm brewing beneath the surface. I am strong and persistent. I know that I can survive months on end of -40°C weather, as well as +40°C in the summer. I know how to drive in whiteouts, and for hours at a time without seeing so much as a tree or hill all while keeping my sanity. I easily can find beauty in the simple things. I love to travel, but find comfort in coming back to the seemingly dull landscape of the prairies. As long as I have my family and my animals close to me, and I am somewhere in Saskatchewan, I will always be home. The Little Barn, although beautiful, is just a house.

Home Series 19 Home Series 20What kinds of things influence your design style?

My design style changes as often as I do. Currently, both natural and industrial elements are the biggest influences in my style. I love any sort of furniture that is made out of reclaimed wood, metal, or vintage leather. Lately we have been putting casters on the bottom of all of our furniture. I live for succulents and am always trying to find a creative way to display them. Although I am an animal activist, I do have several hides, antlers, rugs around our house. (A fact that I am not so proud of.)

Home Series 16 Home Series 17What do you consider to be one of your favourite items in your home? What could you never live without?

My favourite items in my home are without a doubt, my husband, our two dogs, and our cat. My plant collection is also up there. My computer and iPhone are very important as well. 

Home Series 22Home Series 2Please share any ideas/stories/pictures that highlight your home.

I’ll let the pictures do the talking. If you would like to know more about the story of The Little Barn, you can do so by clicking here.

<3

Emory

If you would like to take part in this series,  entitled Home, please email me at helloscarlettblog@outlook.com.

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home series

HomeSeries-HSBLast year I created a series in which I asked a different blogger every month to share a recipe of theirs on my blog. This year, rather than focusing on food, I will be featuring homes from people and bloggers from all around the world.

In Spring of 2014, Kinfolk magazine dedicated an entire issue to the idea of “home.” Given that I spent all of 2014 looking for a new home with my husband and our pets, this issue, as well as the topic itself, is one that I consider to be both an extremely important and equally complex one.

The Spring issue set out to explore:

“the meaning of home, what it looks like, how different people arrange them and the qualities that the best ones share. Whether you live with your best friend, partner, strangers or a lazy hound, your concept of home will change with every coat of paint. It’s what (and who) you fill it with that counts.”

 – Kinfolk 

I often think back to Issue Eleven with a sense of longing, wishing that I could read it for the first time every time I pick it up. It opened my eyes to the inconsistencies regarding the idea of a home, and how it can mean so many contrasting notions to so many people.

For example, here is what it means to these individuals:

JORDAN HERNANDEZ: THE CHILDHOOD DWELLER

Home is one of the first words we learn as a child. It falls from our mouths and rolls off the tongue the way mom and dad do, providing a sense of where we belong. I still remember my first home: the white shutters, the slanted, creaky hallway and the light blue carpet. I remember blowing out birthday candles and seeing snow from the front windows for the first time. It was the only place I recognized as a haven strong enough to collect my childhood. When we moved, I cried in the back of our van as the bricks that laid the foundation to all my memories became a small speck in the rearview mirror. Then there’s the defining moment when you return to an old house that you once knew so well and suddenly feel like a stranger. The cracks and crevices that once held your secrets no longer recognize your voice. You’ll never stop mourning the loss of a first home but rather grow more resilient each time you move. Allow yourself sentimental feelings when you leave a piece of yourself behind somewhere, and look forward to blowing out more candles in a new place.

AUSTIN SAILSBURY: THE NESTER

We started out like newlyweds often do: deep in love, low on cash and living with mismatched furniture. But then we moved to Scandinavia and discovered a whole new way of nesting. Day by day, a little at a time, we’ve made a home for ourselves. Here are the best lessons we’ve learned so far: 750 square feet (70 square meters) are, in fact, enough room for man and wife to live, work and dream together in harmony. Having less stuff is the best way to fight against clutter. An artful light can become a surrogate sun during the dark season. Only homemade furniture will ever properly fit the crooked walls and sloping floors of a stubborn old apartment. A good kettle and a faithful oven are worthy investments for their work is never done. You can’t put a price on dependable neighbors or a view of the sea. And lastly, we’ve learned to put candles in the windows like tiny flickering lighthouses so that friends and loved ones will always be safely guided home.

MOLLY YEH: THE FARMER

Our day begins with eggs from a nearby coop. My farmer leaves for his long harvest hours and my day of homey solitude brings a cake flavored with rosemary from the farmstead garden. My previous life in New York wasn’t for this solitude or private cake: There was always somewhere to be, something new to do. My apartment wasn’t my home—the city was my home. The park was my living room complete with boats and a castle. My apartment was a temporary space, a sleeping place. In North Dakota, my new town offers what half a New York block would. With air to breathe and permission to be still with the land, I can finally love my very own space. Just past dark, when my farmer comes in, he carries elk gifted by Tom from down the road. We prepare it for our supper and enjoy it at the table that we built. Later, the silence and the stars tuck us to sleep.

LOUISA THOMSEN BRITS: THE EVERYWHERER

Home is about presence, not property. Thoughts of home follow the contours of landscape and memory, but the shape of home shifts as I grow less attached to stuff and can live closer to the heart of things. Home is a clearing in a patch of woodland, the curve of a hill, the pulse of life on a dance floor, a shared blanket, birch trees, backyard fires, a strip of beach, dusk, a place to plant things. Home is a lit lantern, slow mornings, spooning, the smell of coffee and wind-dried washing, the dust and heat of Africa, silence, bare feet, everyday rituals, a notebook, a dark field, a small hand in mine. Home is our wooden table with its burn and pen marks, cup rings and scratches, and our huge bed of mattresses pushed together on the floor. Home is wherever we discover we belong: to a place, to another or to a passing moment. Home is honesty, acceptance and relatedness: complicity, community and connection wherever we are.

MIKE PERRY: THE PARENTAL RESIDER

Living with your parents can be a strange, bittersweet thing. I moved back in right after college to get my life in order and then set out on my own. It was a nice change of pace from the school life: Laundry was getting done by someone else and dinner was real food, not just microwave noodles or yesterday’s pizza. I figured I’d stay a few months, but those months became a few years. I moved out again for a year, trying to carve out a life in another country. Unfortunately things there didn’t quite pan out and I found myself back home, again. As I find myself approaching 30 in a struggling economy, it can be difficult and stressful at times—for everyone. But, as with everything, you take the bad with the good, and I’m lucky to have such supportive parents who are happy to have their son still home.

SHELBY GILL: THE MOBILE HOMER 

For me, home is ever-changing, not one static place. It doesn’t have to be brick and mortar: Sometimes home just is. Sometimes home is sitting at the counter of my parent’s kitchen and listening to my mother sing Johnny Cash songs while she makes gazpacho; I’ve never liked gazpacho, but she does, and that makes me happy. So maybe home is the fact that, in that brief moment, she’s happy too. Sometimes home is the third booth back in a small café on Gregg Street, squeezed somewhere behind the woman who plays the mandolin on the front patio and the man who reads the local paper over a double Americano. So maybe home is that feeling of familiarity. Sometimes home is the second chapter of a really good book, where you’re just far enough to be familiar, but haven’t been reading long enough to feel stagnant. So maybe home is just that comfortable place between beginnings and ends. No matter which it is, home is the place that never seems to be stationary. It changes, and so do I.

REBECCA PARKER PAYNE: THE HOMEOWNER

The story of my husband and I is not just about me, him or us, but a story of place. It’s a story of how we married, wrapped warmly in the arms of our community, and bought this tiny house not unlike a small brick box for us to make livable and loved. Ours is a story of believing that buying a house is more than a mortgage and lawn care: It’s understanding that making a home is a responsibility to the walls you live in, the ground you walk on and all the people that will tread here. There’s no escaping this responsibility for us. Ours is a story now intertwined with this place—inseparable, really. Ours is a story that will unfold and grow here. This is the place of our home and the place of our lives, and I’m grateful for it.

– Kinfolk

For the duration of this year, I will be presenting a varying space to you each month, readers, so that you may also witness the diversity amongst us humans in the way of our homes. I hope to take you on an exotic ride, broaden your knowledge about different cultures, and get you thinking about what you really need to feel comfortable in your own homes, among other things.

This month is merely an introduction to an ambitious new series. The above photo is of two homes that I have lived in over the last year. Both are set in the prairies, a type of land that will always be home to me. In February, I will feature the first house, which will be none other than The Little Barn.

If you would like to take part in this series, which is simply entitled Home, please email me at helloscarlettblog@outlook.com.

I’ll see you guys tomorrow!

<3

Emory

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  • Welcome, friends! My name is Emory. I am a wife and mother to three (one on earth, one in heaven, and growing another). This is our life on the Canadian prairies.
    email: helloscarlettblog@outlook.com

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