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“I am beginning to learn that it is the sweet, simple things of life which are the real ones after all.”

– Laura Ingalls Wilder 

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how to: propagate aloe vera leaves

AloeVera1Last November, I published a post on the growth of my first and only Aloe Vera plant. I learned that if properly cared for, these wondrous cacti can live for decades, and many of you had stories to share of such activity. I was simply amazed!

Before owning an Aloe Vera plant, my knowledge on greenery in general was immensely lacking. This included not knowing what the word propagate meant. Over the last few years, many of my own succulents have come and gone (meaning I bought and accidentally killed them), but this lone plant has continued on, flourishing under my amateur watch. Having just had to repot it into a larger home, I knew that the day was fast approaching that I would also have to remove some of its leaves. To this new feat, I was extremely apprehensive. So I studied up on it, and this is how I learned to propagate Aloe Vera leaves.

AloeVera4-1Step 1:

Cut the leaves off of your plant using either a sharp knife, or scissors. Do so at an angle.

Step 2:

Set the freshly cut leaves aside for 1 week, or until sufficiently scabbed over. The waiting time varies from other succulents. Some websites say to wait no longer than 3 days, while others say to wait up to 2 weeks. I waited 1 week, just to play it safe.

Step 3:

After the bottom of the leaves have scabbed over, you are close to commencing the last steps. However, you will need to apply a rooting hormone to aid in the growth of the leaves. I used organic honey, which I applied generously to the ends of the leaf cuttings.

Step 4:

Now you are ready to plant your leaves. Choose a large pot with sufficient drainage at the bottom. Fill it with soil and plant the leaves carefully. Top off with rocks.

Step 5:

Water sufficiently after a few days. That’s all!

While propagating Aloe Vera leaves is a week-long process, in total the steps take less than 30 to complete. This simplicity has made me a little nervous, and I hope that both my new and original Aloe Vera plant will survive my latest attempt at being a gardener. Fingers crossed!

You can get more information on Aloe Vera at monicashealthmag.com.

AloeVera2On a side note, Geoffrey bought me the cutest gifts for St. Patrick’s Day. This included an owl mug and terrarium start-up kit. I suppose if I butcher my Aloe Vera (please, no!), I will alway have a substitute plant.

Do you have any future tips for me and propagating succulents?

<3

Emory

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wood and wire succulent hanger – diy

IMG_1.jpgHappy Wednesday, friends! Have you been experiencing a crazy wet Spring like we have in most of Canada? For the past few days I’ve woken up to several inches of snow, only to have it all melt by the end of the day. I’m sort of getting used to wearing my winter coat and boots in the morning and then rain boots and no jacket in the late afternoon. I thought that I would share a Springy DIY with you, in parts to encourage the nice weather to stick around, and in parts to keep my sanity.

IMG_2.jpgI came across this Wood and Wire Succulent Hanger in a greenhouse. I didn’t actually see the name of what it was really called. What I did see was the ridiculous price tag of this beautiful but $50.00 item, put it down, turn to my husband and say, “I can make this.” So I did.

IMG_3.jpgThis is what you will need:

Moss

Wire (I used chicken wire)

Wood (I reclaimed and old game board)

Plant

Soil

Screws

Drill

IMG_4.jpgStep One. Cut a piece of chicken wire. Make sure that it will be able long enough to wrap around your wood board. Cut extra so that it can also fold under to trap the plant, soil, and moss.

IMG_5.jpgStep Two. Wrap the wire around the wood. Let the two end pieces meet in the back. Fold the bottom up the back as well.

IMG_6.jpgStep Three. Cut some long wire pieces and fasten the ends and bottom together.

IMG_7.jpgStep Four. Add the moss. Place the plant and soil gently within the moss and between the board and the wire. Play around with it until you are satisfied with the way it looks.

IMG_8.jpgStep Five. Hang your lovely project with screws and a drill. Wrap the wire around the screws for added support.

IMG_9.jpgStep Six. Now, water and enjoy!

IMG_10.jpgThe total cost of my project was $9.00 without tax. That’s a heck of a lot better than what it would have been to buy it. Plus, I now have the added bonus of making it a DIY for Hello, Scarlett. Sometimes, life just works out to be in your favour. Hear that, Spring?

See you all in May!

Emory

little stone schoolhouse

PHOTO_1.jpg PHOTO_2.jpgPHOTO_3.jpg PHOTO_4.jpgPHOTO_5.jpg PHOTO_6.jpgPHOTO_7.jpg PHOTO_8.jpgPHOTO_9.jpg PHOTO_10.jpgPHOTO_11.jpgPHOTO_12.jpg PHOTO_13.jpgStone buildings can be found all across Saskatchewan. The majority of them, however, reside in the lower half of the province. Stone was more commonly found than trees, and the early settlers who chose to reside in southern Saskatchewan had come from parts of the world where building with stone was customary. However, cheaper materials eventually replaced the use of stone almost altogether.

The Original Victoria School in Saskatoon is now located on the grounds of the University of Saskatchewan. Flanked by much more impressive grey-stone buildings, this little stone structure is all but a forgotten figure on the campus. Many of Saskatchewan’s original stone schools from the early 21st century have been demolished. However, the fact that Victoria School is still standing and has been relocated to a site of great importance is a testament to the continuity of education and history within this province of ours. Although the school may be tiny in size, what it represents, especially on the grounds of the campus, is absolutely immense. 

Emory

The little stone schoolhouse was built in 1887. It was the focus of social and educational activity during the early years of settlement and remained in use until replaced by a new two-room school in 1902. A few years later the stone school was dismantled and reconstructed on the grounds of the new University of Saskatchewan to make room for a larger school on the original site. The stone schoolhouse, which has been restored as a school museum, is considered the oldest public building in Saskatoon.

– Menno Fieguth and Deanna Christensen, “Historic Saskatchewan”

The first permanent school building in Saskatoon was erected in 1887, a one-room facility constructed of local fieldstone. The first function held there, on its completion in late December, was a grand opening ball.

– Gail A. McConnell, “Saskatoon: Hub City of the West”

People chose stone not only for its resistance to fire, however, but also because it represented durability and prosperity. For major public institutions, such as schools and churches, the use of stone reflected the community’s pride in its ability to build well, and indicated a sense of permanence. For the new frontier, masonry construction, whether of brick or stone, visibly displayed the success of the pioneers and their faith in the future growth of their communities.

– Margaret Hryniuk and Frank Korvemaker, “Legacy of Stone: Saskatchewan’s Stone Buildings”

on this day in saskatchewan history

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The date was 7 April 1909, the event, one of the most exciting in the history of Saskatoon: the city had been selected as the site of the University of Saskatchewan. Whistles were blown and people crowded the streets when the news was received from Regina via telegraph at 11:30 p.m. The following day some 5,000 people gathered at Saskatoon’s CNR station to welcome the men who had been instrumental in selecting the site.

Under the guidance of the university’s first president, Walter Murray, the campus was designed and built ‘not for a decade but a century’. The College Building was to be the most important. Murray said the university must do “something of interest architecturally … The building is the first one, and for many years will occupy the place of honour.”

 Menno Fieguth and Deanna Christensen, “Historic Saskatchewan”

Though Regina won the bid to become the capital city, Saskatoon’s status was affirmed by the government’s decision to make it home to the province’s first university. A site for the institution was selected in 1909, and construction began on the first building, the Administration Building, in the spring the following year. This impressive grey-stone structure sits next to the Saskatchewan River at the centre of an oval promenade known as ‘the bowl’. Its Collegiate Gothic design became the model for the rest of the campus, which has grown to include more than a dozen buildings.

– Meika Lalonde and Elton LaClare, “Discover Saskatchewan: A Guide to Historic Sites”

Over the past few months, I’ve been checking out a larger number of books from the library that centre on Saskatchewan’s rich history. When I was looking through one book in particular, I noticed that the anniversary of the day that University of Saskatchewan was chosen to be located in our city was approaching. So, with my camera and Truman Capote in tow, we walked across the river and around the campus photographing the particular buildings that these historical books were referencing. The U of S itself will always hold a special place in my heart, since it is where I completed my university degree. I am also lucky enough to hold a research position there.

Saskatchewan is the province that I grew up in, moved away from numerous times over a period of 10 years, and then came back to settle down and to put down my own roots as a married woman. It is the province that I feel most at home in, and appreciating its understated magnificence has only come with age. I plan to continue to live in this great place for many years to come.

Emory

  • Welcome, friends! My name is Emory. I am a wife and mother to three (two on earth and one in heaven). This is our life on the Canadian prairies.
    email: helloscarlettblog@outlook.com

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