our acreage: gardens

When we first moved out here, we didn’t have a garden. Geoffrey and I talked about making a large vegetable garden somewhere in our yard, but we couldn’t agree on where. What we did agree on was waiting at least a full year to think about it and get a feeling for where it would work best before we went ahead and dug up the grass. Then the snow began to melt.

What we noticed first was a small square perimeter of wood in our front yard. As the snow melted more, we began to see sand. Once it completely disappeared, we were left with an old 8′ x 8′ sandbox that had clearly been neglected. Not wanting to keep it a sandbox because of all the stray cats and wildlife around here, I eventually chose for it to become my rock garden.

I envisioned a desert-inspired garden with lots of cacti and rocks. I asked many people what I should do to transform this sandbox into a usable, grow-able space and was given lots of ideas. My sister-in-law was the most knowledgeable, so I listened mostly to her. The first thing I did was stain the wood. I chose a darker colour called “Coffee” thinking that it would contrast our light grey house nicely. I went in blind since I had no idea what exterior theme we would eventually go with- modern, western, etc. I therefore aimed for a slightly more modern look.

Next I dug several 1′ x 1′ holes. I think I started with around seventeen. Then I filled them with soil. It was still too cold to plant anything, so for days I just stared out the window at these holes. To me, it looked much too cluttered. I decided to fill those holes back in with sand and dig new ones. This time I ended up with ten. Much better.

Over the next few weeks, I set about getting everything planted in my garden. I started by propagating a few cacti that were growing in our home. Right away it was clear that they weren’t going to survive. (I was too excited and planted them too early.) Then my next door neighbour gave me thyme to put in my garden. I thought, ‘OK, this will be a thyme and cacti rock garden’. A few days later I went to a greenhouse and came back not with cacti but bell peppers, white onions, succulents, and red Canadian roses. Clearly my desert-inspired garden was slowly becoming a vegetable/flower garden. Oh well!

Have you ever tried growing green onion in water from food scraps? It is ridiculously easy, even for a brown thumb like me! After you buy some from the grocery store and consume the dark green part of the vegetable, take the leftover part (the white bulb with roots attached) and put it in a glass of water. Be sure to change the water every day or every second day. Almost instantly you will see new growth occur. I did this for about two weeks before I transplanted them into my garden. That’s when they really took off! They are over 3 feet tall. I have never seen green onion quite like this before. Geoff and I still laugh about how massive they are.

To finish it off, I purchased large river stones to cover the sand. I think that it took around eight bags. Then I bought small smooth pebbles to fill in the gaps. I found the large rocks to line the plant holes along the dirt roads that we walk on everyday.

After filling my rock garden with all of the plants and vegetables that I could think of, I felt like that it began to look a little disorganized. Somewhere along the way I lost my vision of a minimalist cacti haven. Following advice from my mother-in-law and mum to start a garden along the garage, I decided to do just that. I removed the rhubarb from the rock garden, then the sunflower plant, then the white onions, then the peppers, and put them in my new garden that Geoff made for me by rototilling a long and narrow patch. We also added the peonies that we took from our other house. Garden thieves.

I tended to that second garden for a few weeks before I began to notice that every night animals were digging in it. After a lengthy search on Pinterest, I found simple and practical fence options that one could DIY in a matter of a few days. Back I went to Geoffrey, asking him to now build a fence around our spontaneous little garden. He was probably hesitant at first, but once I showed him the pictures, he became very excited and said that he would love to do it.

As an added treat, I took the kids to visit an out-of-town friend for two days. Armed with music, beer, and hot weather, he constructed the cutest darn fence that we have ever had. He used cement, chicken wire, and treated 2′ x 4’s and posts. Then I laid down mulch.

We finished it off by adding hinges and a latch on the gate. Beautiful and practical. Yet, we weren’t done.

Once I saw how lovely the treated lumber looked, I knew that my slightly-modern outdoor theme was now out the window. Rustic was the way to go for our acreage. This meant that I wanted to change the stained wood that housed my rock garden. I sent Geoffrey back to Home Depot for treated 2′ x 6’s. He went and picked them up, then came home and replaced the wood, making it much taller as well. I love the way it turned out. This rock garden will forever remind me of my sister-in-law.

Next year we have plans for raised flower beds in an enclosure along the sunnier side of the garage. Until then, these are our acreage gardens.

Emory

Hello, Followers:
Blog // Instagram // Pinterest // Twitter

sprig west peg board

I purchased this rectangle peg board from a Canadian website that I use to buy the majority of Remy’s shoes. Although primarily a site for children’s moccasins, it features quality-made products for your home as well. I saw and fell in love with this interesting wall shelf by Sprig West.

Made of Baltic Birch, it can be mounted either horizontally or vertically. It comes with four pegs and a shelf, and can hold up to 80 lbs!

This shelf is unlike anything that I have seen before. Given that it is also made in Canada, I could not pass up purchasing it. I’m so glad that I did.

Emory

Hello, Followers:
Blog // Instagram // Pinterest // Twitter

growing a daisy ecocube

I must confess that Geoffrey bought me this cube of daisy seeds nearly two years ago. I remember because it’s the first time that I noticed that my favourite flower is also known as ‘Marguerite’. A few days after learning this, we watched the zombie film “Maggie” and Arnold Schwarzenegger’s daughter, Abigail Breslin, is also named Marguerite. I thought it was a strange coincidence.

Getting back to the cube, I never could bring myself to open it due to a few reasons. One is that I can’t grow anything that isn’t a succulent. Two, the packaging itself was too darn cute. Every time I was about to open it I found myself putting it right back down next to my other plants. I kept telling myself “next month.” 

That month never came. Until recently, that is. Nearly two years later, I’m getting rid of things we no longer need. This includes furniture, baby items, and throwing out dying plants. I knew that it was now or never with growing this daisy cube. 

The instructions of the ecocube are as follows:

1. Open and pull back sticker.

2. Carefully pour 30 ml of water into the cube.

3. Keep the ecocube at a bright, warm place.

4. After 7-14 days, the daisy will start growing.

5. After another 10 weeks the daisy will start blooming.

6. After about 12 months you can bury the entire cube in a pot.

7. The ecocube slowly decomposes and turns into a valuable fertilizer for the plant.

Right now I’m probably on week 3. The seeds have begun growing but are nowhere near blooming. I’m hoping that they will. I really love the idea of an ecocube.

Do you have experiences with anything similar to this?

<3

Emory

Hello, Followers:
Blog // Instagram // Pinterest // Twitter

indoor/outdoor succulent basket – diy

Many weeks ago, I had gone to one of my favourite local greenhouses to buy a hanging succulent basket. I thought that the front of our house desperately needed one, and I had seen these types of hanging planters when I had gone there previously. I had never thought of filling a basket with succulents instead of flowers, and after leaving empty handed that day, I couldn’t get them out of my mind. So after days and days of pining over them, I decided to go back and buy one!

I wasn’t sure how much they cost, but I was hoping that they wouldn’t be more than $50. When I had arrived, I found the first basket and flipped the tag over. It was $75. My heart sank. I did the same for the others and they were all the same price. Darn.

Remy and I walked around the greenhouse for the next 20 minutes hoping to find smaller succulent baskets. There were none. Knowing that all of their plants were reasonably priced, my next thought was to make my own. 

I picked out a beautiful basket and quickly gathered up all of the same type of succulents that were found in it. Then we paid for everything and left. The total was only $23!

Next I asked Geoff to meet me at the dollar store. He was between shifts and so he sat in the vehicle with Remy while I ran inside and grabbed a hanging basket for $2. After that, he drove to his second job and we drove home.

That evening I spray painted the basket and switched out the rope for twine. Then I added the succulents one by one.

After playing around with the arrangement, I grabbed a ladder and drill and went outside. First I hung the iron bracket. Finally, I hung the basket.

Remy helped! Kidding, she kept going in and out of the house and closing the door on me. Brat.

All in all I’m more in love with my version of the succulent basket than what I saw at the greenhouse. It was really fun to make. Additionally, I saved $50! 

This is something that will last the entire year, as you should bring it inside during the colder months. Then, its back outside for the spring and summer. For $25, how can you go wrong?

<3

Emory

Hello, Followers:
Blog // Instagram // Pinterest // Twitter

hanging terrarium: diy

To me, there is almost nothing more beautiful than a terrarium. To see a plethora of vibrant colours all contained within glass is like a living oil painting. I also love the challenge of keeping the greenery alive. When it flourishes, it’s a great achievement.

I purchased this hanging terrarium and air plant at the Gardenscape trade show. Remy and I went together and Geoffrey stayed behind in order to work on our house. Maneuvering a stroller through the displays while trying to keep grabby baby hands away from all of the plants proved to be difficult. I actually came home with a pocket full of succulent leaves courtesy of little miss. What I also picked up were a few great items to which I turned into a hanging terrarium.

Afterwards, I hung it up near our front window. It looks so beautiful. Too bad the wall behind it needs much work! Oh well. One project at a time. ;-)

Have a wonderful weekend.

<3

Emory

Hello, Followers:
Blog // Instagram // Pinterest // Twitter

  • Welcome, friends! My name is Emory. I am a wife and mother to three (two on earth and one in heaven). This is our life on the Canadian prairies.
    email: helloscarlettblog@outlook.com

  • Calendar

    December 2019
    M T W T F S S
    « Nov    
     1
    2345678
    9101112131415
    16171819202122
    23242526272829
    3031  
  • Follow

    Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 2,743 other subscribers

%d bloggers like this: