holy sh*t

Processed with VSCOcam with a6 presetHave any of you ever owned an Aloe Vera plant? They are remarkable. Not only can you use the leaves to treat scrapes and burns, but rubbing its juices on your scalp can also reduce dandruff.

I bought my succulent a year and a half ago. It looked like this:

img_84Today, my Aloe Vera plant looks like this:

Processed with VSCOcam with a6 presetThis sucker just won’t stop growing! The day is fast approaching when I’m going to have to repot its leaves. Based on the Farmer’s Almanac website, it looks quite easy. These are the steps:

1. Knock your Aloe out of its pot and find where the offsets are attached.

2. Sever the offsets from the mother plant with a knife.

3. Allow the cuts and the mother plant to callus over for a day or two.

4. Pot them in a standard potting mix, and place in a sunny location.

5. Wait a week to water and keep the soil on the dry side.

Processed with VSCOcam with a6 presetVoila! You can see my previous post on tips for successfully growing succulents here.

Have a fantastic Wednesday!

<3

Emory

have you seen haveheart

IMG_10.jpgHappy Monday, guys! How was your weekend? Did you get up to any 4th of July related activities? Mine was filled with working and taking an impromptu road trip with my husband. For a girl who normally prefers winter over summer months, I am loving how much easier and more fun it is to travel when there is not six feet of snow on the ground! I kind of don’t want the nice weather to go away, ever.

This month HaveHeart Magazine published a DIY of mine that is really great for the summertime. Most of you have seen it already, but here is the link again. Reclaimed wood, plants, dirt, moss, and chicken wire? A plant and sun enthusiast’s haven!

<3

Emory

pork and beans

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I purchased my succulent Pork and Beans on the first of April. I would normally never write a post about only one of my succulents, but I just love this little plant more than anything! When I brought it home, it looked like this:

Screen Shot 2014-05-18 at 9.20.49 PM

In a little over a month and a half, it has tripled in size. (You can see it now sitting in the middle of the planter box in the first photograph, and in the photograph below.) I am able to track its growth on a daily basis. Never have I ever had such success with any of my other succulents. Mine tend to grow slowly but surely, rather than rapidly and heartedly. One of my followers on Instagram recently asked me what my secrets are to growing succulents. While I touched upon it here, I didn’t go into great detail. Now, I want to tell you what I told her. Here are my essential tips for keeping these types of plants.

Processed with VSCOcam with se3 presetA Growing Guide For Successful Succulents

1. Do not bother to invest in pre-packaged, expensive soil. Rather, choose soil from your garden, or preserve the soil that the succulent came with. Top it off with rocks.

2. Always keep your succulents in small clay pots, even if it looks as if they are outgrowing them. Make sure the pot has a drainage hole.

3. Place your succulents in bright, but indirect lighting. Although they may look resilient, they can also burn very easily.

4. Keep your home at a warm temperature. They do not do well in cool temperatures.

5. Do not water them more than twice a week. Keep in mind, though, that each succulent is different. Based on trial and error, I have learned that certain succulents of mine require watering two times a week, while others are on a biweekly schedule. The majority of them, however, I water them once a week.

6. That being said, make sure that your water has either been distilled or is rain water. Water straight from the tap will not help your plants. Store it at room temperature. 

7. I often read that succulents will need to be fertilized once a month. I tried this once with about six of my succulents, all of which ended up dying shortly thereafter. I do not recommend fertilization, but you may have success with it.

8. Try to have fun with them. Experiment in different succulents, and monitor them each day to see how they are doing. Rotate them when you notice them leaning towards the sun. Water them less often if you see that they are turning black, or more often if they appear to be drying up. Remember, while this list may help you grow your succulents more successfully, it does not guarantee their survival. Try not to stress over them too much, because in the end they are only plants. Even my little Pork and Beans!

Emory

wood and wire succulent hanger – diy

IMG_1.jpgHappy Wednesday, friends! Have you been experiencing a crazy wet Spring like we have in most of Canada? For the past few days I’ve woken up to several inches of snow, only to have it all melt by the end of the day. I’m sort of getting used to wearing my winter coat and boots in the morning and then rain boots and no jacket in the late afternoon. I thought that I would share a Springy DIY with you, in parts to encourage the nice weather to stick around, and in parts to keep my sanity.

IMG_2.jpgI came across this Wood and Wire Succulent Hanger in a greenhouse. I didn’t actually see the name of what it was really called. What I did see was the ridiculous price tag of this beautiful but $50.00 item, put it down, turn to my husband and say, “I can make this.” So I did.

IMG_3.jpgThis is what you will need:

Moss

Wire (I used chicken wire)

Wood (I reclaimed and old game board)

Plant

Soil

Screws

Drill

IMG_4.jpgStep One. Cut a piece of chicken wire. Make sure that it will be able long enough to wrap around your wood board. Cut extra so that it can also fold under to trap the plant, soil, and moss.

IMG_5.jpgStep Two. Wrap the wire around the wood. Let the two end pieces meet in the back. Fold the bottom up the back as well.

IMG_6.jpgStep Three. Cut some long wire pieces and fasten the ends and bottom together.

IMG_7.jpgStep Four. Add the moss. Place the plant and soil gently within the moss and between the board and the wire. Play around with it until you are satisfied with the way it looks.

IMG_8.jpgStep Five. Hang your lovely project with screws and a drill. Wrap the wire around the screws for added support.

IMG_9.jpgStep Six. Now, water and enjoy!

IMG_10.jpgThe total cost of my project was $9.00 without tax. That’s a heck of a lot better than what it would have been to buy it. Plus, I now have the added bonus of making it a DIY for Hello, Scarlett. Sometimes, life just works out to be in your favour. Hear that, Spring?

See you all in May!

Emory

  • Welcome, friends! My name is Emory. I am a wife and mother to three (two on earth and one in heaven). This is our life on the Canadian prairies.
    email: helloscarlettblog@outlook.com

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