pork and beans revisited

Pork and Beans - 2Nearly two years ago, I had blogged about my newest and fastest growing succulent, Pork and Beans. These plants are known as Sedum or stonecrop plants. To date, this specific type of succulent remains my favourite of over the thirty types that I am currently growing. Its delicate leaves have fallen off over the years and have turned into several separate and flourishing plants of their own. I thought that I would share some additional information and care tips about the Pork and Beans succulent. Additional facts can be gained from the Balcony Container Gardening website.

Screen Shot 2016-02-15 at 11.35.39 AMIntro: The jelly bean plant, also called pork and beans, is an interesting succulent plant that displays jelly beanlike leaves. In the summertime its leaves change from green to bright red, and it bears yellow flowers in the springtime. This colorful succulent does best in hot, sunny apartment balcony gardens and will look best as a “ground cover” in plant containers underneath tall plants with a small footprint, such as a jade plant pruned to look like a tree. The jelly bean plant will also look stunning in a short, squat container set on a table or in a hanging window frame-like plant container.

Scientific Name: Sedum rubrotinctum

Plant Type: Succulent cactus

Light: Full sun

Water: Water the jelly bean plant more in the spring and summer, but still let it dry out in between waterings. Plant Sedum rubrotinctum in well-draining potting soil and never let it sit in water.

Zone: Zones 9 to 10

Temperature: This succulent plant does best in hotter conditions. Do not keep Sedum rubrotinctum outside in freezing temperatures. Take the jelly bean plant inside and display it in an indoor garden for the winter. Keep it by a western- or southern-facing window.

Fertilizer: Fertilize in the spring and summer once a month with a cactus and succulent fertilizer.

Pests and Diseases: No insect pests or diseases are known to severely attack this plant.

Propagation: Propagate the jelly bean plant by taking cuttings. Cut off leaves from the stem, let them dry, and then place the cutting into the soil. Keep the potting soil moist until the cutting begins to grow.

Misc. Info: Be careful when touching this succulent plant, as it can irritate some people’s skin. Also make sure that no pets or children eat this plant. Jelly bean plant leaves are delicate and can fall off easily.

<3

Emory

Hello, Followers:
Blog // Instagram // Pinterest // Twitter

winter succulents : how to care

Processed with VSCOcam with se3 presetBelow is a guide on how to care for your plants during the winter months.

Unless you are lucky enough to live in a location that does not fall below freezing during the winter, many of the most popular and beautiful succulents will need to be brought indoors for the winter. A greenhouse is ideal, but few gardeners have this luxury. Fortunately, most succulents can easily be over wintered indoors.

Succulents encompass a huge assortment of different plants, some of which have very specific needs. However, the tips outlined below will keep most of the commonly grown succulents alive through the winter.

Succulents often have a habit of becoming stretched out and leggy when kept indoors, resulting in weak and ugly plants by spring time. This can be minimized by taking into consideration three important factors when caring for succulents indoors during the winter: light, water, and temperature.

Light is Critical

The biggest factor in keeping succulents alive over winter is light. Too little light will cause succulents to stretch in an effort to get closer to the light source. Succulents, in general, thrive in full sun. This is difficult to provide indoors, but give them as much direct sunlight as possible. A south facing window is best, but east or west windows will work.

Fluorescent lights can be used, if natural light is insufficient. It is important that the plants be kept within 1 to 2 inches of the bulbs. Fluorescent light becomes practically useless to plants at more than 3 inches from the bulbs. Incandescent bulbs are too hot and give off the wrong spectrum of light for plant growth.

Succulents Need Little Water During the Winter

Succulents are always better off too dry, than too wet. This is especially true during the winter when the plants are receiving less than ideal light and cooler than normal temperatures. Keep your succulents on the dry side during the winter. Water just enough to keep the plants from shriveling. In a cool room, you may only need to water once every 10 to 14 days.

Be especially careful to keep the plant itself dry, especially rosette plants like Echeverias. Water will set in the center of the rosette and rot will quickly turn the plant to mush. Remember, the quickest way to kill a succulent is to keep it wet!

Cool Temperatures are Good

Most succulents do not need to be kept especially warm during the winter. The important thing is to not allow them to freeze. 45°F to 55°F is perfect. Keeping the plants cool will keep them in a semi dormant state. A warm location encourages the plants to grow and with the lower light intensity indoors during the winter, results in leggy plants. 

No Fertilizer Needed

Succulents do not need any fertilizer during the fall and winter. You want to keep the plants alive, not encourage them to grow.

These steps have worked very successful for me in over wintering Echeveria, tender Sedum, Aeonium, Agave, Aloe, Crassula, Graptoveria, Kalanchoe, Faucaria, Senecio, and others.

By keeping the plants bright, dry, and cool, they remain in a semi dormant state all winter, with minimal stretching. Once frost-free weather returns, the succulents can be returned outdoors for a summer of basking in the sun.

Words by Josh Spece. Photograph by Emory Ann Kurysh.

Hello, Followers:
Blog // Instagram // Pinterest // Twitter

outdoor photography : the golden hour

Golden Hour 3The more that I learn about photography, both by reading and through trial and error, the more I am amazed at how the most subtle changes can make the world of difference. For instance, I am a huge fan of landscape photography. Yet, only last year did I learn that there is a “right” and “wrong” time to shoot outdoors. Are any of you aware of this rule? It’s what is called the Golden or Magic Hour. It is known as the time immediately succeeding dawn, and preceding dusk.

Because I cannot learn anything without having the urge to share it with my readers, I decided to lead by example. Above is a photograph that was taken during this time last year just prior to the sun setting. There is no filter on the picture. Below is another photograph that was taken at the same location, but in the middle of the afternoon. Again, without a filter.

Golden Hour 4Can you see the difference?

Golden Hour 4Prior to sunset (no filter).

Golden Hour 2In the afternoon (no filter).

The difference is astounding. For those of you who are amateur photographers like I am, I wholly encourage you to take the Golden Hour into consideration if and when you decide to shoot outside. Also, to read up on any tips and tricks that you can get your hands on. It’s as simple as googling “best times to take photographs outdoors.” I guarantee you that your own skills will vastly improve by doing so. Who knows, one day we might actually be mistaken for professionals!

<3

Emory

Hello, Followers:
Blog // Instagram // Pinterest // Twitter // Facebook

holy sh*t

Processed with VSCOcam with a6 presetHave any of you ever owned an Aloe Vera plant? They are remarkable. Not only can you use the leaves to treat scrapes and burns, but rubbing its juices on your scalp can also reduce dandruff.

I bought my succulent a year and a half ago. It looked like this:

img_84Today, my Aloe Vera plant looks like this:

Processed with VSCOcam with a6 presetThis sucker just won’t stop growing! The day is fast approaching when I’m going to have to repot its leaves. Based on the Farmer’s Almanac website, it looks quite easy. These are the steps:

1. Knock your Aloe out of its pot and find where the offsets are attached.

2. Sever the offsets from the mother plant with a knife.

3. Allow the cuts and the mother plant to callus over for a day or two.

4. Pot them in a standard potting mix, and place in a sunny location.

5. Wait a week to water and keep the soil on the dry side.

Processed with VSCOcam with a6 presetVoila! You can see my previous post on tips for successfully growing succulents here.

Have a fantastic Wednesday!

<3

Emory

  • Welcome, friends! My name is Emory. I am a wife and mother to three (two on earth and one in heaven). This is our life on the Canadian prairies.
    email: helloscarlettblog@outlook.com

  • Calendar

    August 2019
    M T W T F S S
    « Jul    
     1234
    567891011
    12131415161718
    19202122232425
    262728293031  
  • Follow

    Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 2,719 other subscribers

%d bloggers like this: