on the university grounds

I had the pleasure of spending a small portion of the evening with this family a few weeks ago. Based on my text messages with the mother beforehand, I had a strong feeling that they would be easy and fun. I wasn’t disappointed! We spent nearly an hour running around the grounds of the university. It was a warm, fall day, and the sun and the clouds were nearly perfect. I was largely inspired by this Alaskan photographer that night, and my pictures reflect her moody images that she is known for.

To book a session, please visit Prudence + Me Photography.

Emory

Hello, Followers:
Blog // Instagram // Pinterest // Twitter

little stone schoolhouse

PHOTO_1.jpg PHOTO_2.jpgPHOTO_3.jpg PHOTO_4.jpgPHOTO_5.jpg PHOTO_6.jpgPHOTO_7.jpg PHOTO_8.jpgPHOTO_9.jpg PHOTO_10.jpgPHOTO_11.jpgPHOTO_12.jpg PHOTO_13.jpgStone buildings can be found all across Saskatchewan. The majority of them, however, reside in the lower half of the province. Stone was more commonly found than trees, and the early settlers who chose to reside in southern Saskatchewan had come from parts of the world where building with stone was customary. However, cheaper materials eventually replaced the use of stone almost altogether.

The Original Victoria School in Saskatoon is now located on the grounds of the University of Saskatchewan. Flanked by much more impressive grey-stone buildings, this little stone structure is all but a forgotten figure on the campus. Many of Saskatchewan’s original stone schools from the early 21st century have been demolished. However, the fact that Victoria School is still standing and has been relocated to a site of great importance is a testament to the continuity of education and history within this province of ours. Although the school may be tiny in size, what it represents, especially on the grounds of the campus, is absolutely immense. 

Emory

The little stone schoolhouse was built in 1887. It was the focus of social and educational activity during the early years of settlement and remained in use until replaced by a new two-room school in 1902. A few years later the stone school was dismantled and reconstructed on the grounds of the new University of Saskatchewan to make room for a larger school on the original site. The stone schoolhouse, which has been restored as a school museum, is considered the oldest public building in Saskatoon.

– Menno Fieguth and Deanna Christensen, “Historic Saskatchewan”

The first permanent school building in Saskatoon was erected in 1887, a one-room facility constructed of local fieldstone. The first function held there, on its completion in late December, was a grand opening ball.

– Gail A. McConnell, “Saskatoon: Hub City of the West”

People chose stone not only for its resistance to fire, however, but also because it represented durability and prosperity. For major public institutions, such as schools and churches, the use of stone reflected the community’s pride in its ability to build well, and indicated a sense of permanence. For the new frontier, masonry construction, whether of brick or stone, visibly displayed the success of the pioneers and their faith in the future growth of their communities.

– Margaret Hryniuk and Frank Korvemaker, “Legacy of Stone: Saskatchewan’s Stone Buildings”

on this day in saskatchewan history

PHOTO_1.jpg PHOTO_2.jpgPHOTO_3.jpg PHOTO_6.jpgPHOTO_5.jpg
PHOTO_7.jpg
PHOTO_8.jpgPHOTO_9.jpg

The date was 7 April 1909, the event, one of the most exciting in the history of Saskatoon: the city had been selected as the site of the University of Saskatchewan. Whistles were blown and people crowded the streets when the news was received from Regina via telegraph at 11:30 p.m. The following day some 5,000 people gathered at Saskatoon’s CNR station to welcome the men who had been instrumental in selecting the site.

Under the guidance of the university’s first president, Walter Murray, the campus was designed and built ‘not for a decade but a century’. The College Building was to be the most important. Murray said the university must do “something of interest architecturally … The building is the first one, and for many years will occupy the place of honour.”

 Menno Fieguth and Deanna Christensen, “Historic Saskatchewan”

Though Regina won the bid to become the capital city, Saskatoon’s status was affirmed by the government’s decision to make it home to the province’s first university. A site for the institution was selected in 1909, and construction began on the first building, the Administration Building, in the spring the following year. This impressive grey-stone structure sits next to the Saskatchewan River at the centre of an oval promenade known as ‘the bowl’. Its Collegiate Gothic design became the model for the rest of the campus, which has grown to include more than a dozen buildings.

– Meika Lalonde and Elton LaClare, “Discover Saskatchewan: A Guide to Historic Sites”

Over the past few months, I’ve been checking out a larger number of books from the library that centre on Saskatchewan’s rich history. When I was looking through one book in particular, I noticed that the anniversary of the day that University of Saskatchewan was chosen to be located in our city was approaching. So, with my camera and Truman Capote in tow, we walked across the river and around the campus photographing the particular buildings that these historical books were referencing. The U of S itself will always hold a special place in my heart, since it is where I completed my university degree. I am also lucky enough to hold a research position there.

Saskatchewan is the province that I grew up in, moved away from numerous times over a period of 10 years, and then came back to settle down and to put down my own roots as a married woman. It is the province that I feel most at home in, and appreciating its understated magnificence has only come with age. I plan to continue to live in this great place for many years to come.

Emory

  • Hello, friends. My name is Emory. I live on the Canadian prairies with my husband, daughter, and animals. Welcome!
    helloscarlettblog@outlook.com

  • ❄️✌️❄️ Sleepy Hollow.
  • Archives

  • Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 2,476 other followers

%d bloggers like this: